Gympie business leaders, including Chamber of Commerce president Tony Goodman, say the council can help them thrive through initiatives like clear signage and relaxed parking.
Gympie business leaders, including Chamber of Commerce president Tony Goodman, say the council can help them thrive through initiatives like clear signage and relaxed parking.

What Gympie businesses think will help with bypass

THE Gympie bypass will within the next few years transform this region, and one business owner said more relaxed parking would be a big help in the transition.

Emilia’s Cafe owner Jodi Giorno said less parking restrictions would be a big help for businesses once the bypass is complete.

It was one of several suggestions by Gympie business leaders when asked how they thought Gympie Regional Council could help the business community manage what will be a huge shift in the region. And there is history of councils playing a key role in post-bypass success.

The Kempsey Shire Council in New South Wales waived outdoor dining application fees as part of its bypass strategy. It is one of the factors behind the town’s 21.8 per cent explosion in job numbers since it was bypassed.

Jodi Giorno.
Jodi Giorno.

Ms Giorno said relaxed parking rules would help businesses manage the change.

“If they want to park in the street for longer, make it so they can,” she said.

“A $50 ticket is a good whack.”

More shaded parking was another idea to consider, as well as a temporary rates reduction to take pressure off, Ms Giorno said.

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It was an idea also floated by Mary St businesswoman Lorraine Broadley.

The Toyworld and Twiga Books owner said this would be an interesting idea; more advertising and promotion of the “historic precinct” city centre by the council was another.

Madills owner Adam Madill agreed, saying it was key “to bring day trippers and visitors into town”. “Especially to Mary St,” he said.

Parking fines in the CBD can cost at least $50.
Parking fines in the CBD can cost at least $50.

Signs and advertising help was also raised by members of the Gympie Chamber of Commerce.

Chamber president Tony Goodman said one member noted “Gympie streets are not laid out in a nice grid pattern and directions can be confusing, and it’s a bit hard for a local to do it as destinations are obvious to them”.

Offering incentives for cafes, promoting open hours and creating an “entertainment” book were suggested, too.

Gympie Times


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