A councillor wants to bottle tap water to put an end to the region’s long-running water-mining wars.
A councillor wants to bottle tap water to put an end to the region’s long-running water-mining wars.

Would you pay for bottled tap water?

A TWEED Shire councillor wants to bottle tap water to put an end to the long-running water-mining wars.

Pryce Allsop will propose the motion at Thursday's council meeting. He says bottlers will continue to demand water, meaning they will go elsewhere if council simply bans water mining.

Water mining protesters blocked two trucks in Uki on Saturday which they believed were carting water illegally.
Water mining protesters blocked two trucks in Uki on Saturday which they believed were carting water illegally.

"If our local businesses were to cease the extraction of water it would seem that we would be simply passing the baton and allowing the opportunity for ground extraction from aquifers outside of our own valley," Cr Allsop said.

"It would seem logical that to alleviate some of the demand away from the water extraction industry that we bottle good old-fashioned purified water.

"Ideally, we would utilise recycled glass to bottle package our product."

Councillor Pryce Allsop has proposed a solution to end the water wars in the Tweed. Picture: Jerad Williams
Councillor Pryce Allsop has proposed a solution to end the water wars in the Tweed. Picture: Jerad Williams

Four northern NSW businesses are extracting water and selling it to bottlers in Queensland.

Environmentalists in the Tweed have reached boiling point, protesting again yesterday because the council has not shut down the area's water mines.

The protest was held the outside Tweed Shire Council's Murwillumbah office as representative of two anti-water mining groups met with Green mayor Katie Milne and council officers.

This comes two weeks after activists blocked water trucks from leaving a mine at Kyogle, and another protest at a council meeting last month when a development was approved.

Cr Allsop said the succcess of his plan would depend on consumers.

"The consumer would have the opportunity to make this product of Tweed a success or a failure," the motion reads.

"It is within the consumers' ability to choose between sustainable harvested water or extracted water.

"A policy position could be that water is only harvested for this purpose when the dam is above 90 per cent capacity."



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