Guided bus tour through the Clem7 tunnel from Ipswich Road to ICB.
Guided bus tour through the Clem7 tunnel from Ipswich Road to ICB.

Tunnel navigation tech to end travel confusion

NEW navigation technology is being rolled out in Brisbane tunnels so that confused motorists don't get lost when their GPS unexpectedly drops out.

The Courier-Mail can reveal more than 930 road navigation beacons are being installed in the city's three biggest tunnels, to replace GPS signals when they hit a black spot.

The beacons are currently being tested in the AirportlinkM7 and Clem7 tunnels, with the technology to soon be installed in Legacy Way in the coming weeks.

The technology, which is an Australian first, will help ensure motorists don't miss their exit or force them to re-enter the tunnel to go back the other way when their GPS loses its signal.

The technology is already being tested in the Clem7 tunnel.
The technology is already being tested in the Clem7 tunnel.

Transurban Queensland's head of technology Luke Abercrombie said the move was about improving the on-road experience for Linkt customers when they travelled through the tunnels.

"We know it can be frustrating for our customers when their navigation drops out and they miss their exit, so these beacons will make a big difference in helping our motorists get to where they want to go, quickly and safely," he said.

"We're proud that Brisbane is leading the way in terms of technology innovations.

"Not only is this technology an Australian-first, it's also one of the largest installation of road navigation beacons anywhere in the world."

It is understood GPS dropouts have been a key gripe from motorists using the tunnels, which can reach 60 metres underground.

Transurban Queensland is working with Waze to install the beacons.

Head of the Waze Beacons Program Gil Disatnik said the beacons were free to use through any navigation app.

Motorists will need to turn on Bluetooth on their device to access the navigation technology. The beacons work by emitting a Bluetooth signal which is picked up by devices, such as mobile phones or tablets, using their navigation apps. A number of workers rely on GPS to get around the city, including taxi, ride share and delivery drivers.



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