Giant Rat Tails Grass
Giant Rat Tails Grass Contributed

The much-feared weed that may be winning Gympie Region war

GIANT Rat's Tail grass seems to be the environmental weed that is winning.

A lands protection report to Gympie Region councillors on Thursday said the pasture weed is responsible for more than half the Biosecutiry Orders sent by the council to landowners so far this calendar year.

And no-one quite knows what to do about it.

Enforcement processes involving private landowners meant many people were not reporting the presence of weeds on their properties and the invasive weeds problem was not getting any better, staff reported.

Cr Bob Fredman suggested council subsidies for weed poisons.

"Unfortunately, it may be that GRT is here to stay,” mayor Mick Curran said at Thursday's councillor briefing.

Cheaper poisons would not be a "silver bullet,” he said

Cattle, neighbours and vehicles could easily carry the seed and the best control so far seemed to be intensive cultivation of the affected area.

Western area councillor Hilary Smerdon said landowners need to be clearly advised of what actions they can take.

Cr Glen Hartwig said may people had thought groundsel was out of control, but it generally had been dealt with.

He said more quarantine precautions needed to be taken by cattle yard operators, real estate agents and visiting contractors.

Deputy Mayor Bob Leitch said government agencies set a poor example in many cases, especially Transport and Main Roads, which would be subject to action over roadside infestations if it were a private owner.

Gympie Times


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