Visual art students (from left): Sian Priest, Megan Thomas, Tahlia Yarrow, Tamyka Jewell, (back) Maggie McKeown, Dan Knott, Chrislyne Poniman, Sarah McIntyre, Renee Butcher and Jesse Petrie at their exhibition.
Visual art students (from left): Sian Priest, Megan Thomas, Tahlia Yarrow, Tamyka Jewell, (back) Maggie McKeown, Dan Knott, Chrislyne Poniman, Sarah McIntyre, Renee Butcher and Jesse Petrie at their exhibition. Contributed

Students visual exhibition

AN emergence of James Nash State High School Year 12 Visual Art students celebrated in an exhibition of their own artwork.

The night captured their journey through art, experiences in skills, techniques, ideas, concepts and creativity.

This extraordinary and sometimes very personal journey consisted of persistence and perseverance as the fabric that binds an artist and keeps them working when all odds are against them.

Many of the students can speak of stumbling blocks, moments of sheer terror, frustration, problem solving, break through and inspiration.

Without inspiration the obvious tools of creative production are of little use.

However, eight artistically talented students contributed to the exhibition unveiling exciting interpretations displaying personal recollections, childhood memories, nature, a passion for design, and a simple sketch from past artworks and given a second chance emerge new beginnings.

Merchandise manufactured by Visual Art Studies students under the supervision of Mrs Corbett were for sale on the night and produced many varied ‘one of a kind’ items for early Christmas purchases. The Hospitality Students and Jo Laing provided the refreshments.

A special mention goes to Jesse Petrie who designed the invitations and banner, Tahlia Yarrow for the catalogue compilation, Greg Lawler for the printing of banner and teacher aide Gaynor Ramke for her tireless support.

The schools Art Curriculum teaches students to think through and within a material allowing some means through which images become real.

Sometimes art helps students learn to say what cannot be said, encouraging those to reach into their poetic capacities to find words that can be seen.

Art enables students to have experiences that no other source can provide and through such an experience discover a range and variety of what they are capable of feeling.

Albert Einstein was once quoted, “If what is seen is portrayed in the language of logic, we are engaged in Science. If it is communicated through forms whose connections are not accessible to the conscious mind but are recognised intuitively, then we are engaged in Art.”

Gympie Times


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