Speed cameras do help save lives

POLICE have linked a significant reduction in the road toll so far this year with a state-wide improvement in the behaviour of motorists.

As of yesterday, 213 people had died as a result of traffic accidents on Queensland roads – 90 fewer than the same time last year.

State Traffic Support Branch acting chief superintendent Col Campbell said while it was an improvement, the progressive 2010 road toll was still not the result police were looking for.

“But it is good that people are starting to take notice,” Chief Superintendent Campbell said. “There has been a noticeable reduction in speeding in general, with more people driving to the speed limit and road conditions.

“I can say anecdotally that speeding fines are down on last year.”

Regional roads – particularly major highways linking cities and towns – are still the most common location for fatal crashes in Queensland.

An increase in speeding detection, including extra fixed cameras and the addition of covert mobile speed cameras to Queensland roads, has been credited with influencing the driving of motorists for the better.

Police will roll out more covert speed cameras leading up to the Christmas holidays – a notorious period for fatigued drivers covering long distances, drink driving and fatal accidents.



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