Intelligent signs on the Bruce Highway seem to be working better now, alerting drivers to an accident between a Peugeot wagon and flat bed truck on the killer stretch yesterday.
Intelligent signs on the Bruce Highway seem to be working better now, alerting drivers to an accident between a Peugeot wagon and flat bed truck on the killer stretch yesterday.

Signs not up to speed

INTELLIGENT signs on the Bruce Highway may be now alerting motorists to crashes on the deadly stretch, but motorists say they still aren’t up to speed when it comes to warning motorists about how fast they are going.

Yesterday morning the signs alerted motorists to an accident on the highway near Skyring Creek where a Peugeot wagon and a flat bed truck side-swiped each other.

There were no injuries.

But motorists have complained the $2.8 million Intelligent Transport System between Cooroy and Gympie installed by the state and federal governments is not working properly.

Drivers who use the stretch say they are being told by the Variable Message Signs (VMS) they are speeding or tailgating when they say they are not.

A Department of Transport and Main Roads spokesperson said the VMSes on the Bruce Highway are part of an ongoing trial being rolled out in stages.

“The signs are currently in speed awareness phase, displaying messages relating to speed such as, ‘Slow down, you are speeding’.

“In coming months, the signs will have increased capacity to detect tailgating and display an advisory message.”

The spokesperson said the signs on the Bruce Highway were not designed or intended for legal enforcement.

“Speed detection devices are placed in the road surface approximately 500 metres before the signs and are calibrated to accurately detect the speed of all approaching vehicles.

“Motorists pass the speed detection devices then, half a kilometre later, the signs display specific messages to motorists who were not doing the right thing at the time they passed the detection devices.”

The spokesperson said there were a number of reasons why a motorist who believes they are travelling below the speed limit may still receive a targeted message.

These include: A motorist may have been travelling above the speed limit at the time of detection (500 metres before the sign) and may have reduced speed by the time the message was sighted and their speedometer checked.

A motorist may have seen a message intended for another motorist travelling too fast, either in front of or behind them. Or the vehicle’s speedometer may not be accurate.

The spokes person said the advanced warning technology is an effective way of improving road safety by aiming to reduce crashes and inform drivers.

“Six Variable Message Signs (VMS) have been installed along the Bruce Highway at Black Mountain, Federal, Coles Creek, Tuchekoi, Traveston and Kybong,” the spokesperson said.

“The signs display targeted messages according to the measured speed of approaching vehicles. When fully operational, this system will be capable of recognising particular types of driver behaviour and then displaying the appropriate message.”

Gympie Times


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