Road rage fears among Queensland motorists

QUEENSLAND motorists believe there were more road rage incidents on the State's roads than there were five years ago, the RACQ said.

Almost 88 percent of motorists surveyed felt road rage had become a more common issue in the last five years, and eight out of 10 female motorists believed the incidents were getting more severe.

RACQ's Lauren Ritchie said road rage should not be tolerated on Queensland roads.

"Motorists shouldn't have to fear aggressive or violent attacks by other drivers," Ms Ritchie said.

"Some people quickly forget that we are all equal on the road. We are all trying to get to our destination quickly and safely."

Ms Ritchie said RACQ wants the Queensland Police Service to put a greater emphasis on targeting anti-social driving behaviours, including tailgating and cutting off other drivers.

"These types of behaviours are common factors in road rage incidents and unfortunately can be the catalyst to aggressive and sometimes violent altercations between drivers," she said.

Ms Ritchie said RACQ was working with the University of the Sunshine Coast on better understanding driver behaviour and the need for more courteous driving.

"It's about sharing the road and we want to make sure that every time you get behind the wheel you don't forget to treat others kindly on Queensland roads," she said.

"Whether you're a motorist, cyclist, motorcyclist or pedestrian we all have to work together. No one group owns the road."
 



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