Lynward heifers run on scenic Mary River flats at Kenilworth.
Lynward heifers run on scenic Mary River flats at Kenilworth.

Retirement leads to sale of dairy herd

CLEARING sales are unfortunately becoming more prevalent as dairy farmers face an unequal struggle to remain in business.

Jim and Shirley McIntyre of Lynward Jersey Stud at Kenilworth, have decided to retire and offered 98 head of milking cows, as stage one of the retirement process, after a long dairying and farming history in the region.

The McIntyres conducted a dispersal sale three years ago but continued with dairying.

Lynward jerseys trace their cow history back to the 1930s and many cow names have been used since that time.

Lynward cattle have achieved success at many agricultural shows and the cows have a reputation among those who have bought them in the past, for willingness to produce, easy handling and fitting into any herd, while adding superior genetics.

Though only a small group of buyers attended the sale, values were well in line with recent sales and better than others where good quality dairy cattle had to be sent on the truck.

The on-property sale was conducted by Cochrane Livestock and Rural Services. Auctioneer John Cochrane, well known for his colourful and descriptive phrases, aptly described the udders on the cows as like "a Muttaburra mailbag".

It was a good reference to the milking qualities bred into the cows!

A well presented catalogue, photographed by Hanna Davis and designed and researched by Catherine McIntyre and Lee Milligan, was a format for others to follow.

Top price of the 80% clearance sale was $2200 paid by a Beaudesert buyer for Lynward Elton Muriel, who has been 46 days in milk on this calf and has production figures of 22 litres a day, protein of 2.95 and fat of 4.68. A cell count of 85 attracted buyers wanting to improve their herd's genetic resistance to high cell count milk.

Buyers seemed reluctant to either buy or pay much for any cows with cell counts of more than 300 or in the older age bracket.

Of the 102 cows from Lynward Stud offered, 21 were passed in, for a sale total of $77,400 and an average of $955.

Buyers from Tamworth, Miriam Vale, Beaudesert and the Lockyer Valley were prominent, while locals were also active. Some buyers had received notices from their processor regarding milk supply and were eager to increase production in the months before the end of the year.

All cows offered had been herd tested, except those that were too fresh to test.



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