The Tin Can Bay Coast Guard commander Harley Moss and PlateMaster director Andrew Shilleto on the new Coast Guard vessel.
The Tin Can Bay Coast Guard commander Harley Moss and PlateMaster director Andrew Shilleto on the new Coast Guard vessel. Craig Warhurst

Rescuers get new vessel

A NEW Tin Can Bay Coast Guard boat is set to make life safer for boaties using the Wide Bay Bar.

The new $153,000 vessel, purchased after years of fundraising, arrived Tuesday much to the delight of QF17 commander Harley Moss and Tin Can Bay's other Coast Guard volunteers.

Mr Moss said the 5.9m, 1.8-tonne PlateMaster, powered by a 175hp Suzuki outboard, would greatly increase the Coast Guard's ability to help boaties in trouble.

"It handles well at high speed," Mr Moss said.

"It also services our need for assists inside and outside the Wide Bay Bar."

The boat is capable of a speed of 33 knots at 5500rpm but Mr Moss said that would improve as the engine wore in.

The vessel was built by Maryborough-based PlateMaster to an American hull design.

Director of PlateMaster Andrew Shilleto said the design was a wider version of their standard hull.

"It makes the boat a lot more stable," Mr Shilleto said.

"The ride is smoother and we can put a larger engine on the boat."

He said the vessel was very safe for bar crossings and should work well for the Coast Guard.

The new rescue boat will replace the Coast Guard's smaller vessel, Mt Rescue, and will compliment the larger diesel-powered Shark Cat, Cooloola Rescue II.

The new boat is named Rescue III but will be renamed at a naming ceremony in the near future.

Mr Moss said the boat would be cheaper to operate than its big brother Cooloola Rescue.

Rescue III would be used most of the time and Cooloola Rescue used in extreme conditions saving the Coast Guard money in servicing costs.

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