A collapsed mine shaft in a yard in Alice Street has been fenced off by the Gympie Shaft Repair Program.
A collapsed mine shaft in a yard in Alice Street has been fenced off by the Gympie Shaft Repair Program. Renee Pilcher

Rain flushes out mine shaft

THE Gympie shaft repair team yesterday fenced off for security, what appears to be an old mine shaft that collapsed in an Alice Street yard after heavy rain in Gympie.

“A subsidence area about one metre in diameter appeared in the lawn,” Mines and Energy spokesperson for the Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation (DEEDI) said.

“Continuing rain is preventing the shaft repair team to get machinery on to the site to inspect the area and determine the type of rehabilitation work.

“During and after periods of heavy rainfall, the ground weakens and becomes soft due to saturation. Timbering and other support covering unfilled historic mine shafts become stressed and prone to failure, creating the potential for subsidence.

“Mines shafts are subsequently either capped or backfilled depending on an assessment by expert repair teams.

“Since the Gympie Shaft Repair Program began in 1990, $14 million has been spent to remediate approximately 2000 mine subsidence issues, including the capping of 870 mine shafts.”

The Queensland Government funds the Gympie Shaft Repair Program under the Statewide Abandoned Mine Lands Program to progressively make safe the many historic gold mining shafts around Gympie.

Gympie Times


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