Poo transplants could save thousands

IT MIGHT sound like a crap idea, but poo transplants could end a major worldwide killer.

Fecal transplants have been found to be more successful in treating intestinal infections than previously thought.

Research published journal Microbiome reveals healthy changes to a patient suffering clostridium difficile microbiome are sustained for up to 21 weeks after transplant, and has implications for the regulation of the treatment.

Clostridium difficile, a bacterial infection that causes gastroenteritis, is a leading cause of diarrhoea and severe abdominal pain and kills thousands worldwide every year.

US researcher Michael Sadowsky collected fecal samples from four patients before and after their transplants.

They noticed after transplantation patient samples appeared to sustain changes in their microbiome for up to 21 weeks and remained within the spectrum of fecal microbiota characterised as healthy.

"Our study shows that there are both short- and long-term changes in the fecal microbiome following transplantation," Mr Sadowsky said.

"While we have many similarities in fecal microbiota amongst humans in general, there are individual differences that make us all unique, but do not effect apparent gut functioning."



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