Gympie Police Sergeant Kylie McCellan and Senior Constable Brett Stoward don their red noses in support of SIDS and Kids Queensland.
Gympie Police Sergeant Kylie McCellan and Senior Constable Brett Stoward don their red noses in support of SIDS and Kids Queensland. Renee Pilcher

Police being silly seriously

GYMPIE police officers Kylie McClellan and Brett Stoward are being silly for a serious cause today.

Sergeant McClellan and Senior Constable Stoward are just two of many Queensland police donning red noses in support of Red Nose Day.

This year marks the 25th anniversary of Red Nose Day, which raises funds for SIDS and Kids Queensland, the organisation that provides bereavement support to families who have experienced the sudden and unexpected death of a baby during pregnancy, birth and infancy, regardless of the cause.

In Australia, more than 3500 families experience the sudden and unexpected death of a baby or child each year. To date, it is estimated that SIDS and Kids has saved the life of more than 7500 babies across Australia since the Red Nose Day appeal began in 1987.

SIDS and Kids Queensland also provide Safe Sleeping education programs designed to reduce the rate of sudden infant death syndrome and fatal sleeping accidents. The education and support services are provided to the Queensland community free of charge.

Red Nose Day merchandise can be purchased at Big W, Target, Best & Less and other specialty retailers, or online at rednoseday.com.au.

 

Risk Factors for SIDS

  • Prone (on the stomach) sleeping position.
  • Exposure to tobacco smoke, in utero and through passive and environmental smoking after birth.
  • Most at risk for SIDS are infants who are premature, of low birthweight or from multiple births; whose mothers are young, have low levels of education, live in poor socio-economic circumstances, smoke and leave little intervals between pregnancies; whose fathers are absent or unemployed.
  • The risk of SIDS is higher for male infants, and the risk peaks between 1 and 3 months of age. Deaths usually occur during the night, and are more frequent in the winter months.
  • Indigenous infants in Queensland are 3.5 times more likely to die from SIDS.
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