NSW school’s formal awards labelled ‘sexist, racist’

Parents at a NSW high school have complained about a series of racist and sexist "awards" Year 10 students have been asked to nominate their classmates for as part of an unsanctioned school formal.

Students at Nowra High School, on the South Coast, have been sent an online survey to nominate their peers in categories such as "best ass", "most likely to have a sugar daddy", "biggest Bong Lord" and "best Asian" at the student-organised end of year celebration on Friday night.

Other categories include "first to be a parent", "biggest flexer", "most likely to live off Centrelink", "most friend zoned" and "biggest rack".

 

An online survey was sent around from students to nominate peers in certain categories.
An online survey was sent around from students to nominate peers in certain categories.

 

The awards are part of a school formal.
The awards are part of a school formal.

 

 

It is unknown exactly who is circulating the online form.

One mother contacted News Corp Australia to say she had complained to school staff about the nature of the awards but was told it was not a school-run event and teachers were powerless to act.

But when The Telegraph contacted the Department of Education yesterday, a spokeswoman said they would investigate and punish the students responsible for the survey.

The spokeswoman reiterated that the formal, to be held at Nowra Golf Club, had not been organised by the school.

 

The Department of Education will punish the students responsible for the survey.
The Department of Education will punish the students responsible for the survey.

Many schools stopped ­officially endorsing Year 10 formals after the school leaving age was raised in 2010.

"The school is deeply disappointed by the actions of students who have organised the event and created the highly inappropriate online survey," the spokeswoman said.

"The survey has been taken down and the school will continue to investigate the issue to determine those students responsible.

"Any students found to have been involved will be counselled and disciplined according to the school's disciplinary policy."

The mother who spoke to The Telegraph on condition of anonymity likened the incident to cyber-bullying.

 

One parent warned a student could commit suicide, like Dolly Everett did after being cyberbullied. Picture: Adrian Brown
One parent warned a student could commit suicide, like Dolly Everett did after being cyberbullied. Picture: Adrian Brown

 

"Dolly Everett committed suicide because of the same sort of stuff," she said.

"Surely the teacher could do something about it, it is pretty disgusting.

"They said there is nothing they could do about it and they said they have nothing to do with the formal because it is organised by students."

Bullying expert Christine Bennett said jibes like the ones in the survey were rampant among young people.

"Depending on a child's self-esteem it can lead to suicide if it is not handled well by the parents or the school and they noticed there is an increasing level of depression," she said.

"It does need to be taken seriously. It is rampant in schools, workplaces and even hospitals."



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