Nursing students Georgie Osborne, Kirra Mieran, Jaidyn Lorensen, Yanina Lollback, Sue Smith, Sam Edwards (lecturer), Rosemary Carter and Crystel Schuchmann get to work on their first day of university in Gympie.
Nursing students Georgie Osborne, Kirra Mieran, Jaidyn Lorensen, Yanina Lollback, Sue Smith, Sam Edwards (lecturer), Rosemary Carter and Crystel Schuchmann get to work on their first day of university in Gympie. Craig Warhurst

Our first uni intake

LEARNING how to learn and how to communicate what you have learned is the first step for the first students at Gympie's first university campus.

And, on their first day of study yesterday, up to 40 students were beginning their degrees in Nursing Science and Primary Education.

Many of them were also involved in the university's Tertiary Preparation Pathway program.

They were making a slightly delayed start after floods forced the cancellation of classes earlier in the week.

But the fact that their university building, on the Gympie TAFE campus at Cartwright Rd, is not quite completed yet was not a cause for delay.

The students are using TAFE facilities and specified classrooms at James Nash State High School in the meantime.

The facilities are available under a deal between the University of the Sunshine Coast and Gympie's campus of the Wide Bay Institute of TAFE.

USC Gympie manager Graham Young said the new degrees were a big part of the university's long-term investment in education in Gympie.

"We were supposed to start earlier in the week, but the weather intervened," he said.

But he said the big wet had not dampened the enthusiasm of the 50 students studying one or more courses each.

The university's $5.5 million building is currently under construction at the Gympie campus and is due to be completed by May.

That deadline, as with many construction projects lately, is subject to the caveat, "weather permitting".

An important part of the students' work is the very beginning and that includes the Tertiary Pathways Preparation course, which probably most of us could learn from.

Lecturer Richard Bond says the course teaches creative thinking and critical reasoning, as well as important practical skills such as public speaking.

Gympie Times


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