Assaults fly in the face of party safe campaign

 

Is the One Punch Can Kill campaign failing to make a difference?
Is the One Punch Can Kill campaign failing to make a difference? Allan Reinikka

THE ONE Punch Can Kill message has become a part of society's lexicon.

Even though it is a common tag line, the party safe campaign continues to fall on deaf ears.

In less than a month, The Chronicle has reported on numerous acts of violence.

Most recently cricketer Chris Hall was hospitalised after an altercation on Saturday night.

Allegedly, Mr Hall was punched in the jaw and required specialised treatment in the Princess Alexandra Hospital in Brisbane.

Staff members at Toowoomba Police Citizen's Youth Club believe the key to stopping the violence is by targeting the young.

Is the One Punch Can Kill message getting through?

This poll ended on 25 March 2013.

Current Results

Yes

2%

No

97%

This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.

Hundreds of "at risk" young people have taken part in the club's Happy, Healthy and In Control program.

The program is made available for children as young as 10 and provides them with the skills to stay in control of their emotions.

"It teaches the kids how to have emotional well-being," PCYC youth and community development officer Joe Hess said.

"Also the proper reactions to have to certain situations, like how to walk away from a fight instead of succumbing to peer pressure."

Violence on the streets

  • February 5: 20-year-old man ordered to pay $5000 compensation to another man he assaulted outside a city nightclub.
  • February 12: 18-year-old Dalby man sustains serious head injuries after he was allegedly king hit.
  • February 13: 21-year-old banned from all licensed venues in the CBD after a violent street brawl

A punch can put you in jail

TOOWOOMBA solicitor Dan Creevey reminds people that not only can one punch kill, but it can also result in spending time in prison.

In the past month, The Chronicle has reported on a number of violent acts.

"The Queensland Court of Appeal continues to reinforce that an offence consisting of a single punch can be categorised as gratuitous street violence," Mr Creevey said.

"A sentence including an actual period of time in custody is within range," Mr Creevey said.

"A defendant coming before a court, including a magistrates court, can now expect to receive a custodial sentence and to serve actual time where they are convicted of an offence involving gratuitous street violence."



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