Outside court, he told The Daily Telegraph denied having any intention to attack the police station. Picture: John Grainger
Outside court, he told The Daily Telegraph denied having any intention to attack the police station. Picture: John Grainger

Bailed accused radical: ‘I am no danger to anyone’

A MUSLIM convert who was the first person to be targeted under preventive anti-terror laws says he is no danger to NSW and has been treated unfairly.

After being granted bail last week, Greg Ceissman yesterday broke his silence about being subjected to new laws allowing suspected radicalised inmates to be locked up beyond their sentence or monitored upon release.

"I'm not an extremist," the 24-year-old declared.

Muslim convert Greg Ceissman claims he has been treated unfairly under new anti-terror laws. Picture: John Grainger
Muslim convert Greg Ceissman claims he has been treated unfairly under new anti-terror laws. Picture: John Grainger

The state urgently applied under the new Terrorism (High Risk Offenders) Act for strict supervision to be put in place after Ceissman's release from jail in April. It followed allegations that while behind bars for car theft, Ceissman spoke of intentions to attack Bankstown Shopping Centre and Marrickville Police Station.

An interim order was granted and Justice Stephen Rothman has reserved his decision on whether to grant the three-year Extended Supervision Order.

Behind bars, he allegedly spoke of intentions to attack Bankstown Shopping Centre. Picture: Brook Mitchell/Getty Images
Behind bars, he allegedly spoke of intentions to attack Bankstown Shopping Centre. Picture: Brook Mitchell/Getty Images

Ceissman is accused of breaching those interim conditions and was thrown back in jail just days after his release.

He was granted bail two weeks ago after a judge found any potential risk to the community could be managed.

Yesterday, wearing a cap and white and gold Adidas T-shirt, he attended Central Local Court for the alleged breaches: using the dating app called "F**kbook", a messaging app called Telegram and also Snapchat.

The apps were ­"undeclared" and in breach of the requirements under his interim supervision order, court documents said.

 

 

Outside court Ceissman told The Daily Telegraph: "They have gone too far … It doesn't make sense. It is not fair one bit."

He denied having any intention to attack the police station or "anything like it".

The Redfern man said the monitoring conditions he had to abide by while out in the community were "a bit overboard". Ceissman is expected to enter pleas to the charges next week. He has not been charged with a terror offence.

The court has previously heard that Ceissman, who is of Aboriginal descent, converted to Islam while behind bars.

It is alleged he expressed a threat to kill police officers at Marrickville Police Station, behead police and bomb Bankstown Shopping Centre. He also allegedly said if he was killed during an attack he'd get 72 virgins in heaven.

Ceissman denies saying these things.



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