Childs Farm founder Joanna Jensen with her daughters.
Childs Farm founder Joanna Jensen with her daughters.

‘Miracle’ baby cream owner to help Aussie kids in trauma

It's the skincare company that's taken the world by storm and changed lives with its $10 miracle cream that helps cure eczema.

Now, Childs Farm, the fastest growing baby and child toiletries brand in the UK, is helping Australian children in trauma.

Joanna Jensen, the company's CEO, has joined forces with the Alannah & Madeline Foundation and will provide thousands of bottles of its hair and body wash and moisturiser to be included in the charity's 'Buddy Bags' program.

Childs Farm founder Joanna Jensen with her daughters Mimi and Bella, who inspired her to create her own toiletries brand for children.
Childs Farm founder Joanna Jensen with her daughters Mimi and Bella, who inspired her to create her own toiletries brand for children.

er the last decade, the foundation has provided more than 93,000 of these bags to vulnerable Australian children.

The packs help support children who may have been through a swift and traumatic change in circumstances. They contain essential items such as a toothbrush, toothpaste, hairbrush, pillowcase, facewash, PJs, underwear and socks, as well as a book, activity kit, photo frame and the all-important teddy bear.

The Alannah & Madeline Foundation CEO Lesley Podesta said the support from Childs Farm

will mean a great deal to children during one of the worst times of their lives.

"It's a beautiful gift of hope to children," Ms Podesta said.

 

Childs Farm founder Joanna Jensen said: "We look forward to working with the team and are delighted to play a small part in helping Australia's vulnerable children feel taken care of."

 

Alannah & Madeline Foundation CEO Lesley Podesta with Childs Farm CEO  Joanna Jensen.
Alannah & Madeline Foundation CEO Lesley Podesta with Childs Farm CEO Joanna Jensen.


Ms Jensen said she wanted "everyone to be happy in their skin - whether it's normal, sensitive or even skin that may be prone to eczema".

"It's this sense of inclusivity that resonates so strongly with the works of the Alannah & Madeline Foundation, so there is a great synergy between our two organisations," she said.

"The thought of kids leaving their homes with nothing but some clothes on their back sends

chills down my spine. It is for this reason that we wanted to get involved and help provide

products that could bring a child in this type of situation a bit of pleasure.

"Enjoying a sudsy shower or being lathered in gentle smelling moisturiser can make the best of us feel fresh and relaxed."

The story behind the runway success of the Childs Farm toiletries range, which includes moisturisers, bubble baths and shampoos, is a fascinating one.

Former horse breeder Joanna Jensen was inspired to create an all-natural range and inclusive range of products when she struggled to find suitable toiletries for her own young daughters

"I came up with the idea for Childs Farm because of my daughters Mimi and Bella," she said.

"Both girls have sensitive skin and very fine, flyaway hair. Bella in particular had so many allergies and sensitivities as a baby, it was a real challenge to find anything that suited her skin, and I struggled to find anything that would work for her.

 

“The purpose of everything that we do is for everyone to be happy in their skin,” says Joanna Jensen.
“The purpose of everything that we do is for everyone to be happy in their skin,” says Joanna Jensen.

 

"As a child we were brought up to use natural remedies for any ailment, so I was keen to find something similar for my girls' skin and hair. I was intending to do a degree in natural medicine, but once I started working on the range, it became my full-time focus."

The Childs Farm products - available in Big W stores - are being hailed by parents as miracle workers for children suffering from eczema, the debilitating and painful skin condiiton that affects three in 10 Aussie children.

The $10 baby moisturiser is considered a game changer for parents who have struggled to alleviate their children's eczema.

"The purpose of everything that we do is for everyone to be happy in their skin - so siblings can bath together, use the same shampoo, and share the same moisturiser," Ms Jensen said. "We want products to look inviting for everyone and not present stigma for those who have sensitive skin.

Ms Jensen said the decision to launch the range in Australia was driven by demand from parents who had seen the success of the range in the UK.

Leo’s eczema was causing him pain.
Leo’s eczema was causing him pain.

 

 

"Over the past few years there's been a massive growth in skin sensitivity in Australia, with three in 10 kids now suffering from atopic eczema, so parents more aware of what they are putting on their children's skin than ever before.

"Every day we hear heart-breaking stories of little ones having debilitating skin issues, which puts enormous pressure on parents and families who are exasperated with trying to find a solution.

"There is also a significant Asian population in Australia. According to research conducted by Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, those born to Asian parents have the highest odds of developing sensitive skin issues and eczema in Australia.

One mother who struggled as her baby son's painful eczema made him miserable told News Corp Australia the $10 baby moisturiser had changed her family's life.

Michelle, a mother of two from Queensland's Sunshine Coast, discovered Childs Farm products while she was on holiday in the UK.

Her six-month-old son, Leo, had been diagnosed with eczema and had dry cracked skin on his arms and behind his knees.

Toddler Javi was suffering from painful eczema.
Toddler Javi was suffering from painful eczema.

"The hospital had given us prescriptions for steroid cream for his face and scalp but we didn't want to go down that path and be dependent on costly prescriptions," she said.

Michelle said her son was "miserable" and she was finding it hard to deal with people constantly staring and asking what was wrong with his skin.

Within four weeks of using the $10 baby moisturiser, the rash had cleared up and he no longer had to use the prescribed steroid cream.

The mother of Perth toddler Javi also experienced impressive results

The 15-month-old had a severe, itchy rash on his face. After a few weeks of using the $10 cream, it cleared up and he no longer has to use steroid cream.

"Overnight his skin was instantly improved appearing less red, smoother and not as painful looking," the tot's mother said.

"It even helped stop him from wanting to scratch so much. It was incredible, nothing we had tried previously had had such an immediate impact.

"I was so pleased with the results that we finished the bottle within weeks and ordered several

more, and other products from the range."

 

 

For more information on Childs Farm products visit www.childsfarm.com.au

 

 

Seven weeks after using Childs Farm products, his skin was clear.
Seven weeks after using Childs Farm products, his skin was clear.
Weeks later, his skin had cleared up.
Weeks later, his skin had cleared up.


Good news for the Gympie family of tiny little Winona

premium_icon Good news for the Gympie family of tiny little Winona

Tiny Winona was born weighing only 1035g and needed help breathing

Lives at risk in Gympie region neighbourhood 'no-man's land'

premium_icon Lives at risk in Gympie region neighbourhood 'no-man's land'

Perrett pledges to back ambulance campaign for 6000 residents

Gympie Hammers beat Dolphins to end 20-year drought

premium_icon Gympie Hammers beat Dolphins to end 20-year drought

'It was sort of a milestone for us. Our defence was outstanding'