SHOT ABOVE: Gympie 8-ball player Joe McClintock is preparing for Australian National's with the aim of making in the Australian side.
SHOT ABOVE: Gympie 8-ball player Joe McClintock is preparing for Australian National's with the aim of making in the Australian side. Renee Albrecht

Meet the Gympie young gun cueing up for the open men's team

8-ball: At 16 years old Joe McClintock is the youngest Queensland player selected in the Open Men's State Team and he has his sights on the Australian side.

Despite it not being his first national championships, McClintock is anticipating a challenge in the men's.

"It is exciting to now be selected in the men's side. I have been to nationals for the under-12s and under-15s," he said.

"It's a big step up from under-15s, so the competition is going to be tougher."

With his age, McClintock is in a position where he can be selected for both the men's and under-18s teams.

"I am in a great position to be selected for either but to play in the juniors I would have to leave the men's.

"I can still play in the juniors for two more years, which is why I am leaning towards juniors because I have time to play in the men's.

"Junior selection will be at the end of August and I will be hoping to get a spot."

If selected in the Australian side, this would be the young gun's first time representing his country.

"It would be massive, wearing the green and gold representing your country."

Since he has risen through the ranks, McClintock can see improvements in his game.

"From last year my game has improved big time but I don't really notice it, it just happens," he said.

"You play against the better players - the more you play, the better you get."

His mother is Vicki Gentry and inspired by her love for the game, McClintock was drawn to the sport.

"My mum played and she brought me along to juniors one time and I loved it since there," he said.

"I love that time flies when I'm playing because I'm enjoying myself."

It used to be Gentry teaching him a few things when he was younger but now the student has become the master.

"She taught me a few things but she can't teach me much now," he said.

"I won't be teaching her things because I don't want her to be better than me again."

McClintock is a competitor and strives to play his best game.

"I am a competitor and always do my best effort to win. But if you don't win, then you don't win," he said.

"But that is what a team's for, the rest of the team picks you up."

The competitive nature of the sport is what keeps drawing him back.

"I love how competitive it is. Sometimes people leave you going 'Wow', especially when you play someone at a level below you," he said.

"Some players can hit the ball and they are all sitting on the pocket."

The love of the sport has kept McClintock playing for the past five years but he is left finding new ways to keep his concentration.

"A few years ago I could play all day and not get bored. I get a bit bored playing these days," he said.

"I walk up to the best player in the room and tell them I want to verse them. Also playing against tougher competition."

If selected in the Australian men's side, McClintock will be headed to the World Championships in England.

Gympie Times


Gympie grads say goodbye to school and head for Schoolies

Gympie grads say goodbye to school and head for Schoolies

We wish the Class of 2018 a huge congratulations

A very fine and formal farewell to our graduating Year 12s

A very fine and formal farewell to our graduating Year 12s

Don't miss the 32-page Gympie Formals keepsake

Where you can view Gympie's open homes this weekend

Where you can view Gympie's open homes this weekend

Old world charm and modern convenience meet in this classic Qlder

Local Partners