EMOTIONAL MOMENT: Aubrey Carter and Livingstone Councillor Glenda Mather examine the First World War medal awarded to Mr Carter’s grandfather, Private Aubrey William Carter.
EMOTIONAL MOMENT: Aubrey Carter and Livingstone Councillor Glenda Mather examine the First World War medal awarded to Mr Carter’s grandfather, Private Aubrey William Carter. Michelle Gately Rokmedal

Long-lost medal finds its way home after 40 years

ALTHOUGH they only met for the first time yesterday, Glenda Mather and Aubrey Carter had no shortage of things to talk about.

Between them sat more than 100 years of history in the shape of the British War Medal.

Forgotten treasure found in Livingstone councillor's drawer

Awarded to Mr Carter's grandfather and namesake Private Aubrey William Carter during his First World War service, the medal had been buried at the bottom of Livingstone councillor Glenda Mather's drawer for almost four decades.

Cr Mather had inherited the medal from her father and said she treasured it because it had such special significance for him.

She said research for the Anzac Centenary was the catalyst for wanting to uncover the history of the medal. With the help of The Morning Bulletin, Cr Mather tracked down its rightful owners.

The story Mr Carter did with the Capricorn Coast Mirror when the connection was revealed went viral among his friends, family and Blackall locals on Facebook.

Yesterday, Cr Mather got the chance to pass the medal back to Mr Carter, who was visiting Rockhampton from his Blackall home. Mr Carter said he was very close to his grandfather, so finally being able to hold his medal was an emotional moment.

Pte Carter served in the First World War as a soldier in the 9th Infantry Battalion.

During his service he was awarded the British War Medal for entering the war during a specific period.

Recipients were also awarded the medal, constituted by King George V, for leaving their homes and serving overseas.

Cr Mather said these strong memories of service and sacrifice would have stayed with Pte Carter and now lived on in the medal.

Mr Carter said while the mystery of where the medal had been for more than 40 years had been solved, it was also the start of a new search.

Cr Mather and Mr Carter are now hoping to research how their families may have been connected in the past, to find out why Mr Carter's grandfather would give Cr Mather's father his beloved medal.

They believe the two may have crossed paths in Charleville, where Cr Mather's father Constable Joseph Clay served late in the war.

Mr Carter said his family was considering donating the medal to the Tambo museum.

"I'd like to thank the staff of the Morning Bulletin for their investigative abilities and researching the facts to provide a happy outcome for the recipient's family," Cr Mather said.



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