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Lolly ban sweet for national media

Andrew Reseigh with his step-daughter Ebony Hutchinson in Year One at Collingwood Park School, is pleased that the nearby corner shop is refusing to sell sugary treats to students without parental supervision. Photo: Sarah Keayes MA1010AA
Andrew Reseigh with his step-daughter Ebony Hutchinson in Year One at Collingwood Park School, is pleased that the nearby corner shop is refusing to sell sugary treats to students without parental supervision. Photo: Sarah Keayes MA1010AA

AN Ipswich school that has joined forces with a nearby convenience store to stop students from buying sugary food in school hours will be featured on national television.

As reported in Wednesday’s Queensland Times, Collingwood Park State School made the agreement with the Collingwood Drive shop in exchange for advertising in the school’s newsletter.

While items like lollies, soft drinks and chewing gum are blacklisted during school hours, students can still buy such items with their parents or guardians present.

Collingwood Park State School P&C president Theresa O’Connell, who initiated the deal with the store, said her phone had been ringing hot since the story ran.

Mrs O’Connell said she was busy fielding calls from Channel Nine and 612 ABC Radio yesterday, and will this week appear nationally on Channel Seven’s Sunrise.

She said while most of the reaction she had received was good, she was extremely wary of people taking a negative view on the convenience store.

“It should be seen as them doing a good deed for the school, as they are,” she said.

“I wish for the public to understand that this can only be good for all involved, students and teachers alike.”

Speaking at the school yesterday, Collingwood Park dad Andrew Reseigh, who was three children attending the school, said he thought it was a great idea.

“In the past I’ve seen students walk out from the shop in the morning with bags of chips, energy drinks and all kinds of sugary foods,” Mr Reseigh said.

“It’s not the shop’s fault; it should be up to parents to make sure they know what their kids are eating instead of blindly giving them money.”

Another parent, Jeremy Taylor of Collingwood Park, said the responsibility for kids not to have sugary food should be with the parents, not the corner shop.

Mrs O’Connell said the school was looking for sponsors and volunteers for the school’s free healthy breakfast program, which currently runs three days a week. Anyone interested in supporting the program should contact 3381 4 336 or email cpss-pnc-admin@bigpond.com.



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