Chris Darwin, great great grandson of naturalist and author Charlies Darwin who published his theory for evolution in 1859 book On The Origin of Species, stands next to a famous portrait of his ancestor at launch of Genographic project revealing Darwin's 60,000 year ancestry, proving that Charles Darwin's ancestors were from Africa, at the Australian Museum in Sydney.
Chris Darwin, great great grandson of naturalist and author Charlies Darwin who published his theory for evolution in 1859 book On The Origin of Species, stands next to a famous portrait of his ancestor at launch of Genographic project revealing Darwin's 60,000 year ancestry, proving that Charles Darwin's ancestors were from Africa, at the Australian Museum in Sydney.

LETTER: Since when has evolution had intelligence?

Letters to the Editor

Since when has evolution had intelligence?

Have you ever noticed that, if one listens carefully to the proponents of the theory of evolution, invariably and in a subtle way, they will suggest that evolution has intelligence.

‘Leave my family alone’: Gympie mayor slams creepy photo boast

Setting aside the reality that the complexity of existence as we know it could not have come into existence without intelligence {as the proponents of the theory of evolution, in effect, acknowledge] one must ask the
question, “Since when has evolution had intelligence?”

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A.L.Haack, Eel Creek Road, Pie Creek

British scientist Charles Robert Darwin, founder of the theory for the evolution of life in an undated file photo. An auction house said 22/11/2009 it is selling a rare first edition of Charles Darwin's 'On the Origin of Species' found in a family's guest lavatory in southern England.
British scientist Charles Robert Darwin, founder of the theory for the evolution of life in an undated file photo. An auction house said 22/11/2009 it is selling a rare first edition of Charles Darwin's 'On the Origin of Species' found in a family's guest lavatory in southern England.

More Letters to the Editor

Time has come to ban horse carriages

A horse pulling a cart bolted at the Lockhart Showground last week, injuring four people. This incident provides more damning evidence that the use of horses or other animals for entertainment is out of step with twenty-first century social values.

Two teenage passengers on board were thrown out of the cart, as the horse, alarmed by a loud noise, galloped into bystanders, running over a young woman and injuring another man.

Horses are sensitive and skittish animals. Humans and horses have been seriously hurt—and even killed—when horses have become spooked and run amok. Horse-drawn carriages are appallingly cruel to these gentle animals who can suffer serious leg ailments, lameness and hoof deterioration.

Heritage Day activities at Rosny Historic Centre to celebrate the history of the Eastern Shore, Roly Calvert of Campania with his clydesdale horse Dan, pulling a carriage
Heritage Day activities at Rosny Historic Centre to celebrate the history of the Eastern Shore, Roly Calvert of Campania with his clydesdale horse Dan, pulling a carriage

Horses are considered property under the law, so owners can send them to slaughter when they are old, injured, or exhausted. Since many operators may consider it cost-prohibitive to care for an animal who isn’t bringing in revenue, the fate of discarded horses is grim.

The time has come to ban these carriages for good.

 Desmond Bellamy

Special Projects Coordinator

PETA Australia

Gympie Times


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