Lifestyle

RSPCA Qld shocked by horrific cases of animal cruelty

Veterinary nurse Vicky Carlsson helps treat a kangaroo shot by an arrow.
Veterinary nurse Vicky Carlsson helps treat a kangaroo shot by an arrow. Anthony Reginato

NEARLY 20 native animals and birds have been shot with arrows in Queensland in the past six months.

The majority of the attacks came during school holidays and the RSPCA said this week it was worried the attacks would escalate over the Christmas holidays.

"Why anyone would get their kicks from shooting a defenceless creature is beyond us," RSPCA Queensland spokesperson Michael Beatty said.

"Almost all the animals had to be euthanased because of their injuries and all of them suffered terribly before they came into our care.

"What's even more disturbing is that these are just the ones we know about.

"There are obviously many more that are not reported."

Possums, wallabies, scrub turkeys, curlews and ibis were among the victims and last week three children, about 12 years old, were seen beating a curlew with a plank of wood in Caravonica Park in Calamvale.

"We would urge anyone who has any information regarding cruelty to animals to come forward," Mr Beatty said.

"That horrific attack on the alpacas at Caboolture High School is still unsolved and someone must know something."

Other cases of cruelty to wildlife include:

  • A possum and baby attacked with a spear gun at Norman Park
  • Curlews attacked with arrows at Fig Tree Pocket and Enoggera
  • Scrub turkeys attacked with an arrow at Moorooka, Carina Heights and Oxley
  • Kangaroos attacked with arrows at Wondai
  • Ibis and plovers attacked with arrows at Cranbrook and Heatley near Townsville
  • A goat and plover attacked with arrows at Home Hill
  • A cat attacked with an arrow at Maroochydore
  • Baby magpies attacked with a nail gun at Bribie Island

Topics:  animal cruelty animals pets vet violence

Gympie Times


The expert's look at the Gympie Times Race Day

LEGACY: Dorothy Mary 'Topsy' Bath (1919-2013) was well known for her caring nature and   her participation in equestrian events. This photo, and another of Topsy show-jumping were bequeathed to the museum in her will. Both can be viewed in the sporting display in the House at the Gympie Gold Mining and Historical Museum.

Memorial race carries Topsy Bath's legacy

Gympie cases defy state-wide surge in rotavirus

In the Gympie Regional Council area so far this year, there have been 13 cases of rotavirus notified.

Cases in this region are up slightly on 2016

'Use your testicles': Barnaby keeps cool in Gympie woman's ambush

Deputy Prime Minsiter Barnabay Joyce was given a fiery welcome by Widgee resident Lynlie Cross.

Deputy PM weathers tirade from angry Widgee woman.

Local Partners

Vic police replace Commodores and Falcons with BMWs

While Victorian police have confirmed it's taking a fleet of BMWs, Queensland police have only confirmed Hyundais.

Groom asks guests to fork out $250 for wedding

Ben Farina, 33, and fiancee Claire Moran, 37, asked guests to pay for themselves. Source: Supplied

He “sold it” a bit like an all-inclusive holiday to their guests

Aussie slays partner with virtual reality proposal

Reality and virtual reality collide. Picture: Supplied

He even managed to transport partner back to hometown

Cadbury fans demand return of Marble flavour

A Fan group for a discontinued line of Cadbury chocolate has been set up. Source: Facebook

Cadbury fans plead for Marble line to be returned

No happy endings: Massage therapists sick of sleaze

Chantelle Trebley, from Parap’s Alternative Bodywork Remedial Massage, is fed up with the repeated calls and messages from people asking for ‘happy endings’. Picture: Michael Franchi

“The last two weeks it’s been ongoing.”

How eating a single raisin can stop your junk-food cravings

The author of a new cookbook claims she has a simple, fast way to cure cravings for junk food.

A simple raisin can help curb sweet cravings

Binge-watching services can kill: study

Streaming services such as Netflix make it easier to binge than ever before

Research shows binge-watching services can increase risk of death