Menu
Lifestyle

'I just thought all mums got no sleep'

YOU don't know darkness until you see the light.

You don't know loneliness until you feel the warmth of company.

And for Ipswich mother of four Meltopia Grandelis, she didn't know she had postnatal depression until her fourth child, yet she had suffered through every pregnancy and birth before that.

"I had peri and postnatal depression with all of my children, but I didn't recognise the symptoms," she said.

It was her husband who raised the alarm.

"I was at home with a baby who wouldn't feed and I was petrified he would die of cot death or something at any minute so I would sit next to the cot while he slept," Meltopia said.

"I was so sleep deprived.

"When my husband came home I just walked straight past him, out the door with no shoes on, and just walked around the streets.

RELATED: Deanne's battle with PND: 'I apologise every day that I am not the person he married.'

'All I heard when my baby cried was 'you're a terrible mum'.'

"That's when he rang my GP and said I needed help."

Like many, she didn't take it well.

"I was angry. I thought 'how dare you tell me I need help'. But he forced me to go," she said.

"I just thought 'don't all mothers get no sleep?'."

Meltopia was admitted to hospital in the postnatal depression ward where she was put on suicide watch.

"I remember just thinking 'no I can't go here - I've got lights to buy' because we were renovating at the time," she said.

"It shows I just had no idea how serious I really was."

Meltopia Grandelis says rest is vital for mothers to function properly.
Meltopia Grandelis says rest is vital for mothers to function properly.

Meltopia was given electroconvulsive therapy to help ease her severe depression and talking about it still brings back a flood of sadness.

"When I was wheeled down the ward, knowing my brain was literally about to get fried, that was the most frightening experience," she said.

"When you have it some of your memory goes, so I don't have a lot of memories of when the kids were babies and that's why I don't like to look at photo albums of when they were little because I can't remember them," she said as tears streamed down her cheeks.

But it was all worth it.

The therapy helped Meltopia's mental health and she is off all anti-depressants.

She now knows the importance of sleeping and rest.

As someone who has conquered her inner demons, her advice to other mothers was to build a support network and lean on it when you needed to.

"Find your tribe. Seek out a family member or friend and if you need to pay a doctor to become part of your tribe, then do it," she said.

"And get sleep - the kids will be okay."

Miss last week's episode on kids' health and nutrition? WATCH IT HERE.

Check out our week two episode on 'smack or no smack' HERE.

And out week one episode on technology HERE. 

Topics:  heymumma heymummawork postnatal depression



UPDATE: 'Industries need common sense approach': Perrett

Gympie MP Tony Perrett is one of 18 LNP Ministers named to Qld Shadow Cabinet as the LNP "pushes the reset button”.

Gympie MP excited to fight as part of Shadow Cabinet.

Gympie Cats women enter Wide Bay competition

EXPANSION: Tahlia Little (centre) and the Gympie Cats women's team will now play in the Wide Bay competition.

Gympie Cats women to take on Wide Bay competition

Rattler: 'We can't stop now we've spent too much'

CALL TO ACTION: Councillor Glen Hartwig says the Rattler project delay can be blamed solely on one person.

Hartwig slams $2m blowout announcement as "spin”

Local Partners

Nasa finds solar system with another eight planets

Nasa has found an entire solar system with as many planets as our own.

Simple hack to stop weight gain

This habit comes at a price and can lead to several health problems.

Christmas stress? Try it with six kids under 11

Author and actor Madeleine West. Picture: Nicole Cleary

She has six children aged 11, 9, 7, 5 and 3-year-old twins.

Dog dies with walker: 'I think I left your dog in my car'

Police have issued a devastating reminder to never, ever leave your dog in a hot car.

“I’m really sorry, I think I left your dog in my car”.

How to score $7 movie tickets

MasterCard's 'Millennials Demystified' UNSW experiment.

People aged 18 to 30 make up a significant chunk of card market

What would you do if this crawled up your windscreen?

What would you do if this was on the other side of your windscreen?

Gympie contractor 'surprised' by scaly hitch-hiker.

Grace awarded overseas scholarship to study, intern

NEW OPPORTUNITIES: Foreign Affairs Minister Julie Bishop (left) awards Grace Manahan with a New Colombo Plan scholarship.

'Grace is a role model, proving great opportunities are available'