NOT WORRIED: St Patrick's College graduate Campbell Salter says he's not sweating his OP result. Hundreds of Year 12 grads throughout the region will find out their OPs this weekend.
NOT WORRIED: St Patrick's College graduate Campbell Salter says he's not sweating his OP result. Hundreds of Year 12 grads throughout the region will find out their OPs this weekend. Troy Jegers

Gympie graduate says stress less about your OP results

WHILE high school graduates across Queensland anxiously anticipate the release of their OP scores this weekend, an outgoing St Patrick's College student says he's not too fussed.

Campbell Salter, 17, who hopes to attain an OP7 to gain acceptance into his preferred engineering degree at the University of Queensland, said he had plenty of alternative plans if his results don't go as planned.

"I'm not too stressed. My first three uni preferences require that OP score but if it doesn't work out that way it's not too big a deal,” Mr Salter said.

"UQ is the plan, and my first three preferences there all require a 7 to get in, but there are other universities I can study at if it doesn't work out.

"I'd prefer to study at UQ, but it's not the be all and end all.”

Mr Salter said the intensity and stress of his Year 12 studies had peaked at exam time, but maintains he is relaxed ahead of learning his OP result.

He had some advice for any fellow student suffering under the mental strain of results and future studies.

"Three years from now, an OP is not really going to be that big of a deal. You're going to get in somewhere if you're really determined to do something.

"No one really cares about an OP once you get into that course. If you get a really high result it's great, but it's not a major problem if you don't.”

National youth mental health organisation headspace released data showing 27 per cent of young people who had presented to their centres were not studying or working.

headspace Vocational Programs Manager Carolyn Watts said the fallout of Year 12 completion was an "important time” for young people to reach out through family, personal networks or appropriate services.

"We can place a lot of pressure on school leavers to know what they are doing next, and expect them to have the skills to navigate this time, but this isn't easy,” Ms Watts said.

"Young people today need to develop the mindset and skills to move between a range of roles in a number of fields throughout their working life.

"It's important that we encourage our school leavers to look for opportunities that will allow them to build their employability skills and confidence, rather than focusing on traditional ideas of a dream job or job for life. We need to make it clear to young people that there is always a pathway to reach their goal.”

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