Gold rules when it comes to interior highlights, Christmas decorations and table settings.
Gold rules when it comes to interior highlights, Christmas decorations and table settings. iStock

Give it the golden touch

We've seen the use of metallic finishes as a strong trend for a few years now, but interestingly, it's gold that has outlasted the competition and has won out when it comes to luxe. There are good reasons for this, no other detail is more glamorous than gold, plus adorning your home with a stylish splash of gold adds instant style.

Gold is now used across a variety of interior pieces, from decorative objects to tapware and other hardware, furniture, soft furnishings, wallpapers and even garden furniture and decor.

The thing that's great about accenting with gold is that you are only required to use one great piece or detail with the luxe finish to achieve the desired effect.

With its sunny colour as a base, a gold highlighted chair, lamp or a scattering of gold cutlery will make rooms feel warmer and welcoming - which is perfect for Christmas decor and table settings.

Not restricted to interiors, a highlight of gold can work almost anywhere. Whether it is gold accented pots for the garden, or an inflatable gold swan for the pool, where there is gold there is glamour.

And if you want to try a DIY gold luxe effect, you could spray paint an old picture frame or metal furniture.

If there's one piece of advice worth its weight in gold - avoid going all-out with the bling. Don't overdo it; the gold accent is on the accent.



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