DAVID AND GOLIATH: Anti CSG mining activist Dayne “The Frackman” Pratzky in a still from the documentary captured during a week of anti coal seam gas mining protests at Tara.
DAVID AND GOLIATH: Anti CSG mining activist Dayne “The Frackman” Pratzky in a still from the documentary captured during a week of anti coal seam gas mining protests at Tara. Andrew Quilty

Help bring the Frackman to Gympie

FRACKMAN is like no other Australian film.

It is an observational documentary following ordinary Queenslanders caught up in the multinational "gas rush" to secure coal seam gas, and follows the life of an Aussie pig hunter who decides to take a stand.

Because of the way the movie is being distributed, at least 90 people must pre-book before it can be brought to Gympie on May 11.

To bring it to the Sovereign Cinema go to the Tugg website and book.

Cinema manager Sharon Crane said yesterday more details about the movie and how to pre-book were also about to go on the cinema's website.

The movie follows accidental activist Dayne "Frackman" Pratzky who is building a simple home when the Queensland Gas Company arrives, demanding to sink gas wells on his property.

The company claims that legally he has no right to refuse them access.

So begins his transformation from knockabout pig shooter to passionate activist, and a David and Goliath battle against a $70 billion industry.

The filmmakers have followed his five-year battle that includes triumphs and tragedies, love and conflict and reveals the shocking treatment of landholders by some of the most powerful companies in the world.

The coal seam gas issue is crossing ideological lines, leaving a peculiar alliance in its wake: farmers and greenies, conservatives and radical activists, rich and poor, old and young.

According to the movie website, Frackman was five years in the making and its production and distribution has been made possible by a mixture of agency and philanthropic funding.

"Frackman is a pioneering film, breaking down established models of fundraising, release and audience engagement," it says.

"Following a trend in the US that has seen campaigning films affect real social change - from school bullying to rape in the military, Frackman is as much about the outcome as it is about the story.

"Having raised a significant budget to allow a national 'impact' strategy, Frackman is a new kind of story-led advocacy.

"Yes, it's a very political film, and we make no apology for that," says producer Simon Nasht.

"But it's not party-political in the old tired way that's reduced to a battle between left and right.

"This is a film about a subject that affects us all, and we are creating a new way for people to get involved."

The plan includes an innovative distribution strategy, both in traditional cinemas and online, and in a broad grassroots tour around regional Australia.

Gympie Times


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