The Minneapolis police chief who fired Derek Chauvin after the death of George Floyd, said the former officer "absolutely" violated the department's neck restraint policy.

"The conscious neck restraint by policy mentions light to moderate pressure. When I look at exhibit 17 and when I look at the facial expression of Mr Floyd, that does not appear in any way, shape or form that that is light to moderate pressure," Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo said.

Asked by prosecutors when he believed the restraints should have stopped, Chief Arradondo said: "Once Mr Floyd had stopped resisting. And certainly once he was in distress and trying to verbalise that, that should have stopped.

Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo testifies for the prosecution at the trial of Derek Chauvin. Picture: Supplied
Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo testifies for the prosecution at the trial of Derek Chauvin. Picture: Supplied

"There is an initial reasonableness in trying to just get him under control in the first few seconds. But once there was no longer any resistance, and clearly when Mr. Floyd was no longer responsive, and even motionless, to continue to apply that level of force to a person proned-out, handcuffed behind their back. That, in no way, shape or form is anything that is by policy. It is not a part of our training. And it is certainly not part of our ethics or our values."

Chief Arradondo, who last June called Chauvin's actions "murder" also testified that his officers are trained in the department's de-escalation policy.

"The goal is to resolve the situation as safely as possible. So you want to always have de-escalation layered into those actions of using force," Chief Arradondo said.

 

Dr Bradford Langenfeld testifies at the trial of Derek Chauvin. Picture: Supplied
Dr Bradford Langenfeld testifies at the trial of Derek Chauvin. Picture: Supplied

He said that an officer's goal is "to resolve the situation as safely as possible."

Chief Arradondo said police need to "treat the community with dignity".

"The badge I wear and the member of MPD wears means a lot," Chief Arradondo said.

"It is important for us to treat the community with dignity."

Meanwhile, the Minneapolis doctor who declared Floyd dead testified there was not a heartbeat "sufficient to sustain life" upon his arrival to hospital, believing the stricken man's cardiac arrest was brought on due to a lack of oxygen.

George Floyd and Derek Chauvin. Picture: Facebook
George Floyd and Derek Chauvin. Picture: Facebook

When asked by prosecutors if there was "another term for that", Dr Bradford Langenfeld replied, "Asphyxia".

Dr Langeneld, who was a senior medical resident at Minneapolis' Hennepin County Medical Centre at the time of Floyd's admission, said he went through several known causes of cardiac arrest during his examination of Floyd and concluded that "based on the information that I had, it was more likely" that hypoxia, or a lack of oxygen to the body's tissues, was responsible for him being stricken over the other possibilities.

During day six of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin's trial, Dr Langenfeld described Floyd's condition and attempts to resuscitate him.

"When Mr. Floyd was brought in, would you describe it as an emergency situation?" prosecutor Jerry Blackwell asked.

"Yes, absolutely," Langenfeld said, describing how Floyd was in cardiac arrest and that the goal was to re-establish "spontaneous circulation".

Asked whether Floyd had a heartbeat upon arrival, the doctor said it was "not to a degree sufficient to sustain life."

Dr Langenfeld also confirmed earlier evidence that no lifesaving measures performed by the officers or bystanders before Chauvin took his knee off Floyd's body.

Floyd died in May 2020 after Chauvin placed his knee on the man's neck as he pleaded, "I can't breathe."

His harrowing final moments, which were recorded on video, led to global protests against police brutality and racism.

Originally published as Floyd's cause of death as cop 'absolutely' violated rules



10 suburbs where COVID fragments detected in sewage

Premium Content 10 suburbs where COVID fragments detected in sewage

COVID-19 fragments detected in Noosa’s wastewater treatment plant.

O’Brien unveils $44k statue of a digger in Goomeri

Premium Content O’Brien unveils $44k statue of a digger in Goomeri

The statue represents a Second World War digger, and was built by Everlon Bronze...

Crowd to gather at AFL grounds to farewell beloved Rykah

Premium Content Crowd to gather at AFL grounds to farewell beloved Rykah

The funeral of Cats player Rykah Burr, who passed away after a horror crash at...