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Finally, someone is doing something about tech setup woes

Setting up new gadgets can be incredibly frustrating.
Setting up new gadgets can be incredibly frustrating. Jevtic

YOU know the frustration.

You buy some shiny new gadget.

Take it out of the box and then try to make it work.

Whether it is setting up a new phone, a printer, or a camera, instruction manuals can be hopeless and some things just don't work.

For an industry expected to be worth almost $3.5 billion in Australia by 2022, the consumer technology market has a long way to go.

A nationwide survey commissioned by Canon Australia found 50% of Aussies admit to avoiding the set up of a tech product due to the stress associated with it.

And there is a clear difference between men and women on tackling the issue.

Women are more inclined to ask friends or family for help with their tech issues (73%), where men would prefer to turn to the Internet (53%).

Women are more likely to favour using a chatbot (23%) for a quick and easy response, as appose to their male counterparts (13%)

So what's our biggest tech gripe?

Not being able to connect to the Internet is the biggest technology gripe for Australians (35 per cent), a complaint that rises in importance for those over 50 years old (46 per cent).

Buffering on videos was called out by an average of 14 per cent of Australians, yet it was found to be a bigger concern for males than females (17 per cent vs. 11 percent).

13% of Aussies- regardless of age or gender - chose printer issues as their biggest technology gripe (13 per cent). 

Canon says it answers about 22,000 customers calls a year requesting help with setting up and connecting printers.

"In fact, through this study, we found that Aussies chose setting up their printers as the third most stressful menial task in their lives - just after doing their taxes and setting up flat-pack furniture,'' Jason McLean, Director - Canon Consumer Imaging, Canon Australia said.

In an effort to take the stress out of printer set up, Canon Australia is today launching Canon Print Assist, aiming to help people set-up, connect and print less painfully.

It  will include features such as: step-by-step online tools, video tutorials, a 7 day per week helpline open during business hours, streamlined in-box assistance and specialised Print Assist brochures for each printer, describing key features.

The initiative also includes highly trained in-store Print Assist specialists and easy to understand retail displays to make the purchase experience simple.

The new service is available at stores like Harvey Norman, The Good Guys, and Officeworks among others. Customers can also head to www.canon.com.au/printassist.

Key survey findings:

• One in two (50%) Australians have avoided setting up or using a tech device because of the stress associated with the task.

• Not being able to connect to WiFi (35%), buffering on videos (14%) and printer issues (13%) are some of the technology gripes Australians have in their lives.

• The large majority of Australians (85%) have a printer at home.

• Doing your taxes (25%) or setting up flat-pack furniture (21%) are both seen as more stressful menial tasks than setting up a printer (16%). However, printer setup trumps buying presents for a loved one (15%), missing a postal delivery (12%).

• Australians are most likely to turn to a friend or family member to help with their technology struggles (63%). The Internet is also a favoured option (53%), while relying on a product manual is the preferred method for less than one in three (28%).

• A large percentage of Australians (69%) admit to not using their technology to its full capacity due to not full understanding it. 

• 'How-to' videos are Australians favourite way to receive support (33%), with helplines coming in second (19%) followed by chatbots (18%), in-store help (17%) and dedicated email support (13%).

• Australians are more inclined to purchase products from a company with more post-sales support (78%), as opposed to those that do not (22%).

Topics:  canon games and gadgets technology

News Corp Australia


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