THE wait's not long for this striking French supermini.
THE wait's not long for this striking French supermini.

Fashionably French

CITROEN'S second generation C3 will soon be seen on Australian roads, with first deliveries of the French supermini expected by the end of this month.

It will be available in three core trim level – VT, VTR+ and Exclusive – offering an extensive range of variants. Replacing the original C3 launched in 2003, the manufacturer says its new 2011 C3 boasts a focus on four main areas — style, quality, space and performance.

It is a striking-looking small car thanks to its optional and sizeable panoramic Zenith windscreen, which Citroen claims is the largest windscreen ever seen on a small car. In the flooded and competitive supermini class, this flowing glass area is part of Citroen's “creative technology' way of thinking, )attempting to make the new C3 stand out among its many rivals.

“The stylish, grown-up, yet fun C3 is impossible to confuse with any other car,” said Miles Williams, general manager for Citroen in Australia.

“Retaining the exuberant charm and friendly personality of its predecessor, the new C3 represents a bold, contemporary, dynamically rewarding and fresh approach to the compact family vehicle.”

Citroen claims a class-leading 300-litres of boot space as well as a spacious cabin for the C3, while entertainment choices consist of eight-speaker Hi-Fi system, Bluetooth and USB connectivity. Safety features include ESP, ABS with EBD, EBA and up to six airbags.

The C3 comes with a choice of two petrol engines – one co-developed with BMW – plus Citroen's highly-efficient HDi turbo diesel. Combined cycle fuel economy starts at a competitive 6.1 litres/km for the petrols, and a superb 4.3L/km on the turbo diesel. Before on-road costs, the new C3 has an entry-level price of $19,990.



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