The
The "bird"

ENOUGH! Fed up Gympie driver vows to let texters have it

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The texting while driving epidemic

I AM so sick of seeing drivers with their heads bent down at a 90 degree angle staring at their nether region - not even one eye on the road.

Guaranteed they aren't driving along admiring their private parts (and if they are this is a different issue altogether).

Texting and driving is an epidemic, according to this Gympie letter writer.
Texting and driving is an epidemic, according to this Gympie letter writer. Contributed

People - you are in control of a 1500kg piece of metal travelling along at speed.

A large chunk of metal that can easily kill if not controlled at all times.

Is that text that you are sending/reading whilst you are (not) in control of this large chunk of speeding metal really that important that it is worth seriously harming or killing someone? It's a simple answer every time - NO!

The next person I see doing this is getting a severe honk and the bird from me - I'm completely over it and I cannot believe how much of an epidemic it has become. When did this become OK?

Linda

North Deep Creek

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No need to go back to the horse and buggy days

WE SHOULD all share concern for the children who participated in the climate strike last week (The Gympie Times, Friday, September 20) and equally for their parents who allow these young people to develop such anxiety at such a young age about a subject they are obviously not fully informed about.

Anxiety can lead to significant health issues in later life.

I am a mother of three, grandmother of 10 and as a family we share views but respect each other's point of view when we differ.

WARRIOR: A picture from Greta Thunberg's Twitter feed as she arrives to address the United Nation's Climate Summit
WARRIOR: A picture from Greta Thunberg's Twitter feed as she arrives to address the United Nation's Climate Summit Contributed

I was born during World War 2 and have lived across two centuries of Queensland and have witnessed droughts, floods, bushfires, dust storms and other forms of changes in our climate I, like most Australians do care for our environment.

All science should be based on evidence and there is a lot of evidence not being acknowledged or respected by some in our community. I am sure every one of these parents and their children have a mobile phone, car, washing machines and all the conveniences of modern living - all made from minerals under our soil.

Steel is one of the main components of these items and is made using good quality thermal coal.

Environmental activist Greta Thunberg, of Sweden, addresses the Climate Action Summit in the United Nations General Assembly, at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)
Environmental activist Greta Thunberg, of Sweden, addresses the Climate Action Summit in the United Nations General Assembly, at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow) Jason DeCrow

I support renewable energy but there are other alternatives that are far more environmentally friendly that will provide our industries and homes with continuous power and maintain our lifestyles. No need to go back to the horse and buggy days.

TERESA COBB,

SOUTHSIDE

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Have we reached peak hypocrisy yet?

THIS week US President Trump made a statement completely at odds with everything his country has stood for since WW2.

As is often the case with a man renowned for telling 'falsehoods' at a rate variously estimated as between 6 and 23 per day, his claim that the future belongs to patriots, not globalists, is about as hollow as any could get.

US President Donald Trump and Australia's Prime Minister Scott Morrison at the opening of Pratt Paper Plant in Wapakoneta, Ohio, United States, Sunday, September 22, 2019. (AAP Image/Mick Tsikas) NO ARCHIVING
US President Donald Trump and Australia's Prime Minister Scott Morrison at the opening of Pratt Paper Plant in Wapakoneta, Ohio, United States, Sunday, September 22, 2019. (AAP Image/Mick Tsikas) NO ARCHIVING MICK TSIKAS

This is after all a man who recently wanted to buy Greenland, and had one of his common dummy spits when the Greenlanders and the Danes, who's territory it is, didn't play along.

This is one who's polluted much of the world with Trump towers and golf courses with little care for local inhabitants or their environment.

He's leader of a country with nearly 800 military bases in 70 countries and which is Australia's largest overseas investor.

That all sounds pretty global to me, as do his regular threats and his strong support of chosen friends in the Middle East and elsewhere.

Our PM, busy playing sycophant to Trump and risking our biggest trade arrangements in the process, recently berated corporate leaders for publicly announcing their views on social and environmental issues while willingly adopting the mantras of his chosen ones, whose views and actions suit his agenda.

He's coupled his yet to have any substance 'plan' to deal with plastic waste to Andrew Forest's ideas, as he's done with the cashless welfare card.

The latter comes at huge cost, incidentally being paid to a company until recently chaired by federal National Party president Larry Anthony, and which is owned by members of the Liberal and National Parties.

In short, business leaders who differ should be silent but those who favour his views will have their's heard, and will be rewarded.

More locally, our State MP Tony Perrett recently claimed that Mary River farmers should remain exempt from reef run-off laws as it doesn't affect the reef, while in March of this year his federal counterpart Llew O'Brien, of the same party, was crowing loudly about the $646,000 of funding he secured to help local farmers lessen such run-off, on to the same reef.

Are there inconsistencies here?

While I will never silently stand accused of being a fan of the other side of politics I can't help but notice that all of the above are of one political slant. Hypocrisy, thy name is conservative!

DAVE FREEMAN

CEDAR POCKET

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Baseless theories, guesswork and conclusions based on nothing

RECENT letters and news reports about council matters sometimes make me wonder what planet I'm on.

All the conspiracy theories in the world stack up beside Goldilocks when one tries to fathom the logic of the debate.

Gympie Council Hilary Smerdon, Dan Stewart, Glen Hartwig, Bob Leitch, Mick Curran, Bob Fredman, Mal Gear, Daryl Dodt and Mark McDonald.
Gympie Council Hilary Smerdon, Dan Stewart, Glen Hartwig, Bob Leitch, Mick Curran, Bob Fredman, Mal Gear, Daryl Dodt and Mark McDonald. Renee Albrecht

Whether the previous council engineer was sacked or not is only the business of the employer and the employee.

Councillor Bob Fredman Mary Valley Highway.
Councillor Bob Fredman Mary Valley Highway. Scott Kovacevic

A phone call to the former engineer, now councillor, will put the matter to rest once and for all. Or so you'd think. He has already stated publicly that he retired. People do it every day. He retired.

One prolific letter writer, mired in his own knowledge about everything, started his last letter To the Mayor. If he wants to write a letter to the Mayor, write to him and stop clogging the peoples' page with baseless theories, guesswork and conclusions based on nothing but his own perceived thoughts.

One thing is for sure. We, the ratepayers, pay each of our councillors about $100,000 per year to do the job they fought for in the ballot box. How many of them are councillors and how many of them are business owners who treat the council like a club committee? At least the Mayor works at his job.

Cr Glen Hartwig.
Cr Glen Hartwig. Tom Daunt

How about the councillor who writes incessantly about how poorly the council is run and he's never told anything? This is despite the fact that he's there, moving and voting on council matters on behalf of his employees, we, the ratepayers. Doesn't he know what a material conflict is? He profited from the organisation he keeps undermining!

With an election due next year, we need people with a vision who will see Gympie prosper beyond the next four years. We need representation. We need people who take their sworn duties responsibly. The current lot need to hand back the money with their cars, phones and internet services when they leave office.

David Collins,

Araluen

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Double dip

I WOULD rather raises another issue I have been engaged with council over. Not answered to my satisfaction as yet.

Are you aware council has a minimum land rating figure of $107,000?

Regardless of the valuation of your land you will pay for a minimum value of $107,000. 

In a case such as mine (half owner of a duplex) the land is valued at $113,000. Half each is $56,500. 

Yet we are both rated for the amount of $107,000. Total land rate $214,000.

And we are supposed to think they have our best interests at heart?

As land values naturally increase so will the minimum rate amount increase to keep the poorest paying more than their fair share. Wonderful.

Stephen Smith,

Gympie

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Where is my $1250?

DEAR Queensland Treasurer, I read recently that you are going to give Queensland public servants a $1250 cheque.

Public service will still get a pay rise as well 2.5 per cent rise.

Bit less than what most industry superannuation is growing at. Cbus is getting over 7 per cent for one year. A phenomena I don't understand. How does super get more growth than wage growth? Are we paying for superannuation growth, via higher cost of living? Cost of living is out pacing any wage growth or the price I get for beans.

Where is my stimulus cheque?

I pay same stamp duty as the public service worker.

I pay the same GST as the public service worker.

I pay same parking and toll costs as the public service worker.

I pay same registration as the public service worker.

If I still had kids in school (just finished last year) I pay the same school costs as the public service worker.

I pay the same electricity tariff as those in the public service.

I do not get to retire at the same age as the public service.

I do not get paid the same super as some in the public service.

I recently had the misfortune of having to pop into the Gympie branch of Transport Department.

It was clear the main roads public servant was not at all happy that she had to serve.

If a public servant does not like their job and despise serving the public, then they should probably try a different career path. So I begrudge giving any public servant a $1250 cheque when they clearly don't want to be a Queensland public servant.

I do no get the same salary sacrifice package that is offered to Queensland Health.

This type of package should be offered to all productive workers.

Whether they are bean pickers, or dairy hands or tyre fitters. If people have to move their body and joints, they should enjoy a tax package that helps them keep more of their disposable income. Perhaps that is something you can debate at the next COAG meeting. Argue the case to give regional folk who are productive to keep more of their hard earned wage and give less to the federal government.

I guess Queensland government put forward a very good case to allow Qld health workers to pay less income tax to federal government.

If your argument is to give those who are employed by the Queensland tax payer a helping hand with cost of living, then perhaps those of us who are not lucky enough to grab a Queensland public service could get a discount on our car registration or power bill or free transport for those who don't own a car.

If we all pay less on government expenses, then we can spend more locally to keep regional kids employed. But if that is not appropriate, I am certainly happy to grab a job at the Gympie office of Queensland transport. I would certainly enjoy the air condition to my bean patch. My body would love a less productive job. Stamping papers and doing a bit of photocopying would be very much appreciated by my ageing body.

Job security and public service super is also something I don't have.

Please explain why I am less worthy than a public servant. And why I am not entitled to helping hand from the Queensland government?

Madonna Waugh,

Widgee

What you need to know about prostate cancer

PROSTATE cancer is the most common cancer in Queensland men, so we're urging men to help raise awareness of the disease this Prostate Cancer Awareness Month and better understand their risk to help detect it early.

One in five Queensland men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer by the age of 85 - that equates to around 4000 men each year.

The cause of prostate cancer is still not clear, and in the early stages, prostate cancer often doesn't produce any symptoms. However, we do know that the risk of prostate cancer rises with age and occurs mainly in men over 60 years.

Men with a family history also have an increased risk of developing the disease.

It is crucial that men understand their risk and let their GP know if they have a family history or any usual signs and symptoms to receive the right advice on the pros and cons of prostate cancer testing.

Unfortunately, there is currently no single, simple test to detect prostate cancer.

The test most commonly used to aid early detection of prostate cancer is the prostate specific antigen (PSA) blood test.

However, this test does not always reliably identify the presence of prostate cancer as PSA levels may be elevated from causes other than prostate cancer.

We recommend men speak with their GP about what is right for them, especially if they notice body changes including difficulty or pain in passing urine, or blood in urine, and any of these symptoms combined with pain in the lower back, upper thighs or pelvic region.

If men have questions or concerns about prostate cancer, they should visit their GP or call Cancer Council's 13 11 20 to access information and confidential support.

More information about Cancer Council Queensland is available at cancerqld.org.au.

Chris McMillan,

CEO Cancer Council Queensland

Gympie Times


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