A vehicle goes around a large pothole, marked with a witch’s hat, on Pomona Kin Kin Rd while another vehicle takes refuge on the shoulder of the narrow road. Residents feel the state of the road is putting lives at risk and this is being compounded by motorists not driving to the conditions.
A vehicle goes around a large pothole, marked with a witch’s hat, on Pomona Kin Kin Rd while another vehicle takes refuge on the shoulder of the narrow road. Residents feel the state of the road is putting lives at risk and this is being compounded by motorists not driving to the conditions. Tanya Easterby

Dicing with trouble at Pomona Kin Kin Rd

GETTING behind the wheel is always a gamble but Pomona Kin Kin Rd residents Pam and John O'Farrell are tired of playing the odds.

The couple, residents of the area for more than 30 years, are concerned the stretch of road is so dangerous it is only a matter of time before a life is lost.

"There have been so many near-misses," a frustrated Pam said earlier this week at the front of her house from where she has a perfect view of the road.

Making the road deadly was a worrying mix of driver recklessness, inexperience and the poor condition of the road itself, the couple said.

"I don't want to brand everyone the same but young drivers in particular drive too fast along this road," Pam said.

"People who don't know the area don't know what to expect and they just go too fast for the conditions."

Pomona Kin Kin Rd was awash with Gympie Regional Council workers earlier this week carrying out repairs.

The road falls under the responsibility of Main Roads but the council is subcontracted to carry out maintenance.

Pam and John were pleased to see the repairs this week but felt the work was falling short of a lasting fix.

"The road gets patched up twice a year but it doesn't seem to last long and the problems just come back," Pam said.

The problems Pam refers to include a jumble of pot holes, wash-outs and a surface so severely damaged in sections a trip down the road becomes a bone-rattling experience.

A lone witch's hat on Tuesday warned motorists of a deep pot hole otherwise difficult for motorists to detect in time.

Meanwhile, the couple's location on the road means they are often the first port of call when drivers strike trouble.

John said a few years ago, German backpackers heading for the coast rolled their car sideways up a hill.

"I have no idea how they did it," John said.

"It's dangerous. No-one was killed, thankfully, but it could be a different story next time."

The rough surface has also proven to be an unlikely source of treasure for local residents.

Drivers passing through often lose objects from their car, including pets.

"We've had dogs and cats, a surfboard, a two-way radio and even a butcher's knife," Pam said.

Mattresses and sheets also round out the collection of items lost on the road.

Pam said she didn't want to "have a whinge" but was angry after finding herself at the centre of a near-miss Thursday evening last week.

"A car was going around a corner on the wrong side of the road to avoid pot holes and almost hit me," she said.

"It was almost an accident and I was just angry. Someone will be killed one day."

Pam would like to see the road properly graded once a year with gravel instead of the patch-ups.

That and commonsense from drivers while on the road.

Gympie Times


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