Players celebrate a wicket during the third Test between Australia and England in Perth.
Players celebrate a wicket during the third Test between Australia and England in Perth.

Match-fixing probe: Former star in firing line

ANTI-CORRUPTION officials are flying out to interview an ex-Australian cricket star and top administrator over allegations of match fixing.

The Australians were named by two Indian bookies during an investigation into a plot to spot-fix the third Ashes test at the WACA.

Cricket authorities are investigating six separate match-fixing cases involving approaches to three international captains, including those from Pakistan and Zimbabwe.

 

The Sun newspaper, which carried out the investigation into Indian bookies Sobers Joban and Priyank Saxena, said the ICC's anti-corruption investigating team will start interviewing the ex-player and official "within days" and would fly to Australia to do so.

Anti-corruption officers flew from the International Cricket Council's Dubai headquarters to London yesterday to look at The Sun's dossier, with the head of the unit praising News Corp for bringing the matter to their attention.

Cricket Australia is supremely confident that players and officials have nothing to hide and take pride in the fact that the Big Bash has an unblemished record as the only major T20 league in the world that's been entirely corruption-free.

The ICC quickly dismissed the doubts cast over the integrity of the current Ashes Test in Perth as baseless, but have refused to dismiss the other claims until a thorough investigation is completed.

Anti-corruption chief Alex Marshall said the investigation would take "weeks" and would take place in secret without media commentary.

Sobers Joban (left) with Priyank Saxena during a undercover meeting in Delhi. They claimed they could arrange fixes on Australia vs England Tests. Picture: Dan Charity
Sobers Joban (left) with Priyank Saxena during a undercover meeting in Delhi. They claimed they could arrange fixes on Australia vs England Tests. Picture: Dan Charity

The ICC is pledging to leave no stone unturned with their investigation, and it appears speaking to the ex-Australian star and Australian administrator would be key in their quest to speak to all "witnesses", even if they're dismissed as suspects.

"This needs to be a very thorough investigation. These are serious allegations," said Marshall.

"We will use all the proper investigative techniques. We'll want to speak to all the key witnesses in this case. They may well be suspects that we need to find and interview.

"We'll look to secure all the evidence and the material that is available and, yes, amongst our powers is the ability to demand from participants that they hand over their mobile phone."

Match fixing is a criminal offence in Australia and if evidence was found involving Australians, the ICC would pursue suspects in conjunction with Australian Federal Police.

"As we look through the material we'll make an assessment of whether there might be any criminal aspects to it," said Marshall.

The ICC has warned perpetrators that they have access to spy technology and investigators can recover deleted or destroyed material.



UPDATE: Crash on Bruce Highway ends with person in hospital

UPDATE: Crash on Bruce Highway ends with person in hospital

The patient has been taken to Gympie Hospital.

QDO applauds Llew O'Brien, calls for Royal Commission

premium_icon QDO applauds Llew O'Brien, calls for Royal Commission

'We expect a royal commission will shed light' on the situation

What's the future of our historic, zip-tied bridge?

premium_icon What's the future of our historic, zip-tied bridge?

Historic ties make for a complicated issue.

Local Partners