DIRTY: Lockyer Valley Regional Council has already started issuing orders to farmers to clean up the road after a new policy came into effect last year.
DIRTY: Lockyer Valley Regional Council has already started issuing orders to farmers to clean up the road after a new policy came into effect last year.

Council begins ordering farms to clean up their act on roads

SINCE new powers came into effect, a rural council has forced a number of farmers to clean up their act and roads.

Lockyer Valley Regional Council last year implemented its ‘Mud on Roads Enforcement Process’ to deal with debris left on public roads by farming operations.

The policy came about due to regular complaints to the council about mud and debris left on road by farming operations.

READ MORE: The dirty fine farmers will be slapped with

The cost of cleaning the mud off the roads had been absorbed by council, however under the new policy – the council can order farmers to clean up the roads or send a bill if the council is forced to clean it up.

The farms could also cop a fine.

Since the process came into effect on November 1 last year, several requests for farms to clean up their act have been issued, according to infrastructure portfolio councillor Janice Holstein.

Lockyer Valley Regional Councillor Janice Holstein said farmers who had been issued a request to clean up had done so promptly.
Lockyer Valley Regional Councillor Janice Holstein said farmers who had been issued a request to clean up had done so promptly.

“Lockyer Valley Regional Council has issued a few requests for farms to clean up debris on roads following complaints,” Cr Holstein said.

“Council has not issued any fines to farmers as all issues have been resolved in a cooperative and prompt manner.”

A council spokesperson later confirmed just two orders had been made since the process was introduced.

Cr Holstein said the council stood by the policy, which had been met with community outrage when it was announced.

READ MORE: WHAT YOU SAID: New double whammy for farmers

“Council encourages farmers and building contractors to minimise tracking mud onto roads which creates safety hazards for other road users, in particular for those travelling on motorbikes,” she said.

“This is a sensible approach that, if followed, will mean no fines are issued and ratepayers won’t have to bear the cost to clean up someone else’s mess.”



Scuffle breaks out after Gympie driver tells police f--- off

Premium Content Scuffle breaks out after Gympie driver tells police f--- off

The man had an axe and hunting knives in his car when he was pulled over for not...

Gympie mum pawned generator stolen from neighbour’s shed

Premium Content Gympie mum pawned generator stolen from neighbour’s shed

The Victory Heights woman said she did not know where the generator had come from...

Gympie man airlifted after freak tree-felling accident

Premium Content Gympie man airlifted after freak tree-felling accident

The man, in his 60s, was using a chainsaw at a property in the region