The Federal Government has announced an overhaul to university fees that would double the cost of studying humanities and arts, but “job relevant” course fees would be slashed.
The Federal Government has announced an overhaul to university fees that would double the cost of studying humanities and arts, but “job relevant” course fees would be slashed.

Coast uni’s worry for ‘volatile’ course fee overhaul

THE Federal Government's shake-up of university fees is likely to cause increased volatility in the already struggling sector, University of the Sunshine Coast has warned.

The cost of studying humanities and arts would double, but "job-relevant" course fees would be slashed under the Government's proposed overhaul.

Academic deputy vice-chancellor Tim Wess said the changes, yet to be passed in the Senate, would cause planning and funding challenges.

'YEARS TO RECOVER': USC'S GRIM OUTLOOK AS CUTS FLAGGED

USC BRACES FOR $44M LOSS

He said it would be a concern if only wealthy people would be able to afford to study certain courses and that universities would receive less funding to teach "job-relevant" courses such as engineering.

University of the Sunshine Coast academic deputy vice-chancellor Professor Tim Wess.
University of the Sunshine Coast academic deputy vice-chancellor Professor Tim Wess.

Under the plan, the cost of humanities and communications courses would more than double, to $14,500 for a year of study, but teaching, nursing, English and agriculture courses would cost $3700 a year.

"The proposed fee changes are likely to produce additional volatility around university funding and pose a challenge to planning," Prof Wess said.

"We understand that these changes will see less money coming into USC for each student studying in the Government's priority areas.

"This change is largest for engineering, and so, although the Government wants to train more engineers, USC will receive less money to educate them."

The university is expected to take a $44 million hit to its budget over two years as a result of the collapse of international student numbers due to COVID-19.

Prof Wess said this was the latest in a string of challenges faced by the university.

He said the university, with its five campuses, would work with the Government to suggest new jobs and training pathways.

"Although being job-ready is an important aspect of a university education, there is so much more in terms of development of creativity and critical thinking that is engendered in any university degree," he said.



Violent monster struck woman so hard she soiled herself

Premium Content Violent monster struck woman so hard she soiled herself

A terrified woman jumped from a car and tried to outrun her attacker but he chased...

Qld economy lags but jobs bounce back

Premium Content Qld economy lags but jobs bounce back

Shut state trails all but locked-down Victoria in pandemic recovery

Court rules on case between former manager and CBD business

Premium Content Court rules on case between former manager and CBD business

Gympie magistrate Chris Callaghan has rejected the claim a ‘secret’ credit card was...