TIMES GONE BY: Carryl Watt at The Gympie Times office with a typewriter she may have used more than 30 years ago and the paper’s original printing press in the background.
TIMES GONE BY: Carryl Watt at The Gympie Times office with a typewriter she may have used more than 30 years ago and the paper’s original printing press in the background.

Carryl’s living proof of changing times in Gympie

CARRYL Watt has been reading The Gympie Times for more than 30 years, and a little more closely than most.

She has been part of The Gympie Times family since she started with the paper on February 13, 1983.

“I was proof reading, mainly commercial stuff like pamphlets, flyers for sales, invoice books and other printed material, much of it hand inserted into the paper.

“I also proof read advertisements and editorial for The Gympie Times, the Noosa News and other publications around the Sunshine coast.”

She recalls fond memories “mainly of the people.”

“You couldn’t get a nicer bunch to work with,” she recalled after her 37 years with the paper.

“All the way through, it’s always been a very harmonious group, with everybody prepared to do whatever needed to be done.

“On Sunday nights I would help cut and paste.”

The “new” printing technology of that time involved stories being printed “in great screeds” before being cut to length and pasted onto pages, which were then photographed to produce printing plates.

“It would all be cut to fit the pages and the night sub editor would come in and read through it, to see how it had to be cut to fit the size available.”

Events that stand out were mostly something to do with the floods, for which Gympie is famous.

The Gympie Times was as much a part of that as any other Mary St business.

“I remember packing up and moving upstairs as the flood waters rose”In a big flood, the water would come into the downstairs office to desktop level.”

“It’s been interesting over the years to see the improvement in the quality of the paper and what’s presented.

“A lot of this has to do with improving technology, allowing improvements in content.

Carryl was here for an era in which gold mining ceased, restarted and ceased again.

“The Nestle factory switched from powdered milk to instant coffee, Wilbrahams Store closed, as did a number of hotels, including the Northumberland,” she recalled.

Gympie Times


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