GOOD BUT NOT GREAT: Cedar Pocket Dam and Borumba Dam have had good falls but are far from full.
GOOD BUT NOT GREAT: Cedar Pocket Dam and Borumba Dam have had good falls but are far from full. Contributed

Borumba's new boat ramp has reopened

BORUMBA Dam has risen by 13% and the boat ramp has reopened in time for holidays, following the rainfall from ex-tropical cyclone Debbie last week.

Borumba Dam experienced a healthy rise from 68.3% capacity less than a week ago to a peak of 81.6% yesterday, a rise of 13.3% over five days. The highest level since November 17, 2016.

It may continue to rise slightly higher as the last of the water run-off flows in.

Seqwater said the temporary ramp, which is only accessible using 4WD vehicles, will also remain open to visitors, while they continue to monitor the water level at the lake over the coming weeks.

"In August 2016, the first stage of an upgrade to the boat ramp was completed, however due to the dropping water level it had to be closed and a temporary ramp was installed to maintain on-water access to the lake,” the spokesman said.

"Stage two of the upgrade is still on track for delivery in 2017.

"Upgrading the existing boat ramp was the safest and most cost efficient solution to improving accessibility to the lake. It has been designed to meet Australian safety standards, however when water levels are low we must close the ramp for people's safety.

"Though the ramp is open, the lake is temporarily closed to primary contact recreation activities, including tubing and water skiing, while Seqwater tests water quality to make sure there is no microbiological pollution in the water following the recent rainfall.

"Visitor safety is our priority. We will reopen the lake to primary contact recreation once test results indicate it is appropriate to do so.”

The Mary River swelled with a healthy flush, peaking at 9.53m at Moy Pocket last Friday night and 8.55m at Tiaro at 9:32pm on Saturday.

However the recent rain has not solved the drought problem as Queensland heads into the typically dry winter season and Gympie remains officially drought declared.

According to the Seqwater spokesman, south-east Queensland's water storage is still relatively low.

"Before ex-Tropical Cyclone Debbie hit, South East Queensland had just experienced its second dry summer in a row, with inflows less than that experienced during the Millennium Drought,” he said.

"As a result, the drinking water supply capacity of the Grid Twelve, which makes up nearly 90% of south-east Queensland's water storage, was just above 70%, the lowest levels since January 2010.

"Even though much of Queensland was drought declared. Based on current modelling and consumption rates, south east Queensland was still another wet season away from having to consider water restrictions.

"The rainfall from ex-tropical cyclone Debbie added about six months' worth of drinking water to the south east Queensland region.”

Gympie Times


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