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Booked twice in 24 hrs for drink driving mobility scooter

THE bad luck just kept coming for a Gympie man when he found out his mobility scooter wasn't what he thought it was.

Shane Andrew Conway was on his way to his mum's house after a boozy night at the Railway Hotel when trouble struck.

The 34-year-old, who rides a mobility scooter because he is in need of a hip reconstruction, managed to turn the scooter on to its side outside the hotel around 7.50pm on September 17.

Fortunately for him, passing police stopped and helped him right the scooter but that's about as far as his good luck went.

After that, the drunken Conway was asked whether the scooter was registered, and when police found out it wasn't he was charged for driving an unregistered vehicle.

It only got worse when he was then fined for driving an uninsured vehicle on a road.

Conway said when he bought the scooter four years ago he was told it did not need to be registered. Police checks revealed the silver Invacare Comet was too fast and powerful to be registered as a mobility scooter but was not able to be registered as any other type of vehicle either, which meant it was not allowed to be driven on the road.

Conway's bad luck got worse when he was asked if he had a licence to drive a motorised vehicle on the road, which he didn't, and whether he would undertake a roadside breath test.

He recorded a high-range reading of 0.220% - four times the legal limit - and went home that night with a total of four offences and a court date.

When Conway did the right thing and attended Gympie police station on his scooter the next morning he fell into the exact same trap again.

Police charged him a second time with driving an unregistered and uninsured vehicle and driving unlicensed. They also asked for another breath test.

This time Conway had a blood alcohol reading of 0.069% - he was still over the limit, and charged with it.

Things continued to go downhill when police also impounded the scooter because Conway had been charged with two drink driving offences within five days.

He told Gympie Magistrates Court he had no money to pay the $25-a-day bill for the impounding and that he would lose his only form of transportation.

Magistrate M Baldwin suggested he arrange a payment plan or have the scooter sold so he did not lose any more money. He pleaded guilty to eight charges and was fined a total of $730, given six months probation and disqualified from obtaining a licence for 12 months.

Topics:  drink driving gympie mobility scooter

Gympie Times