Fraser Coast Chronicle photographer Val Horton took this photo the lunar eclipse using a Nikon D4 with a 300mm lens from from Hervey Bay.
Fraser Coast Chronicle photographer Val Horton took this photo the lunar eclipse using a Nikon D4 with a 300mm lens from from Hervey Bay. Valerie Horton

Blood moon dazzles in shortest lunar eclipse of the century

MILLIONS of stargazers watched last night's 'blood moon' in the shortest lunar eclipse this century.

A partial eclipse was visible across Australia, although views along the east coast were hampered by bad weather.

It was also visible in America.

Saturday night's eclipse was the shortest of the century, with US-based Sky and Telescope magazine describing it as "unusually brief".

RELATED LINK: Blood red moon 'a sign' from the heavens

This was the third lunar eclipse in a series of four, known as a tetrad. The first two were in April and September last year, with the final eclipse in the cycle on September 28 this year.

For a lunar eclipse to occur, the Sun, Earth and Moon must align roughly in a straight line. 

Even though the Earth completely blocks sunlight from directly reaching the surface of the Moon, it's still visible to the naked eye.

The Earth's atmosphere refracts sunlight which lights up the moon's surface, but the atmosphere removes certain elements of the light spectrum, giving it the red colouring.

 



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