SKY WATCHERS: Coast residents got up bright and early to capture the
SKY WATCHERS: Coast residents got up bright and early to capture the "blood moon" this morning. Aaron Whittaker

BLOOD MOON 2018: Capturing a once-in-a-lifetime eclipse

SKYWATCHERS around much of the world got up bright and early this morning to catch a glimpse of a one-in-a-life-time lunar eclipse.

The complete lunar eclipse was the longest of this century and coincided with Mars' closest approach in 15 years.

The so-called "blood moon," turned a deep red and was visible at different times in Australia, Africa, Asia, Europe and South America when the sun, Earth and moon lined up perfectly, casting Earth's shadow on the moon.

A total lunar eclipse occurs when the earth's shadow moves across the moon, blocking out light from the sun.

MYTH AND LEGENDS OF THE BLOOD MOON

The total eclipse lasted for one hour and 43 minutes, with the entire event lasting closer to four hours.

For about half the world, the moon was partly or fully in Earth's shadow for six hours and 14 minutes in all.

The moon started turning red about 4:30am AEST this morning.

Did you capture the lunar eclipse? Send your photos to editorial@scnews.com.au.



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