This dingo, photographed dead at Fraser Island, had been previously observed to be emaciated.
This dingo, photographed dead at Fraser Island, had been previously observed to be emaciated. Submitted

Autopsy shows dingo not starved

AN independent autopsy conducted by a Maryborough veterinarian on a dingo found dead on Fraser Island has concluded that it died after being hit by a vehicle and did not starve.

Climate Change and Sustainability Minister Kate Jones yesterday said the dingo had died as a result of a fractured skull and other internal injuries and the autopsy had found injuries consistent with the juvenile male dingo having been struck by a vehicle.

Ms Jones in a phone interview told The Gympie Times that an independent Maryborough vet had found that the juvenile dingo was not starving but suffered a number of serious injuries.

“The dingo had a fractured skull, ruptures to several vital organs and large haematomas to the abdominal and chest cavities,” she said.

“These injuries are entirely consistent with being struck by a vehicle which unfortunately is known to happen on Fraser.

“There was no doubt in the vet's mind.

“In fact, the dingo was in good condition and it weighed in at nearly 15 kilograms (14.8kg) that's overweight for a 10-month-old such as this dingo.

“That's the weight of a typical adult dingo.”

In his report Maryborough veterinarian David Jameson of Walker Street Veterinary Surgery reported that the dingo's condition was lean.

He also reported that the dead animal had suffered substantial injuries and also said “on the skin over the left mandible (jaw) there were two black marks consistent with grease marks from a vehicle”.

“I can confirm the cause of death was exsanguinations (haemorrhage) from laceration of the left caudal lung lobe,” Mr Jameson said.

His report also revealed multiple skull fractures.

Mr Jameson described the dingo's conditions as “lean, little fat palable over ribs, spine or pelvic bones, dogs in the body score used (domestic dog body condition) have between 5 and 10% body fat. Post-mortem revealed there was good lean muscle mass present, this dingo was not emaciated”.

The post mortem was conducted on March 31 at the Maryborough veterinary surgery and also revealed that the dead dingo's stomach contents were “predominantly pippies, there was also small crab claws and sand”.

Climate Change and Sustainability Minister Kate Jones yesterday said the findings put LNP Members Glen Elmes and Ted Sorensen to shame.

“These two MPs jumped the gun on this story and now it's blown up in their faces,” she said.

“We had both of them falling over themselves to get a headline and their three seconds on radio.

“The autopsy carried out on this particular dingo exposes Mr Elmes and Mr Sorensen for what they truly are – environmental frauds.”

Gympie Times


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