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'Suspicious men' who sparked police operation come forward

Electrical apprentice Quinn Jarvis owned up to the geocache.
Electrical apprentice Quinn Jarvis owned up to the geocache.

ELECTRICIAN Tony Bryce and his apprentice, Quinn Jarvis, say they aren't suspicious characters but their behaviour on Thursday certainly had police believing otherwise.

A story in this newspaper told of police hiding out after someone reported seeing two suspicious men put a container into bushes off Blain Dr.

The "suspicious" container was later found to be a 'geocache', part of an elaborate game where people use GPS devices to find hidden items.

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And the two "suspicious" men? Well, Tony Bryce and Quinn Jarvis contacted The Observer to own up.

Mr Jarvis said he thought it was hilarious when he read the newspaper, realising the short trip into the bushes had caused such a stir.

"We went out to find some geocaching things, or something. I'd never done it before," he said.

"Tony was trying to explain how it works to me and then decided to show me one. We thought nobody saw us."

He said he felt embarrassed the police had gone to so much effort but thought it was good they took the report seriously.

"We're not suspicious guys but if it was that situation (a drug pick-up) it's good they did investigate it," he said.

"I'm still laughing about it now."

Mr Bryce started geocaching several years ago.

"It was good to get us out of the house and have a bit of fun with the kids," he said.

"I won't be able to see that one again because it will have to be moved now that everyone knows where it is."

He said he didn't expect to see the geocache on the front page the next day.

"I felt sorry for the poor coppers," he said.

"I don't know how many times they have staked out geocaching sights but there are a couple of hundred in Gladstone."

Topics:  editors picks geocaching police



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