Menu
Business

$12B tax hit on mining profits

The tax overhaul in response to the Henry Review is expected to have major implications for the Mackay region with mining companies predicting thousands of future job losses as a result of the tax.
The tax overhaul in response to the Henry Review is expected to have major implications for the Mackay region with mining companies predicting thousands of future job losses as a result of the tax.

MINERS will face a new 40 per cent tax on profits under an overhaul of the country’s taxation system, which Treasurer Wayne Swan said would ensure prosperity was shared fairly.

But the Queensland Resources Council labelled the changes a “tax grab” and warned they could stave off billions of dollars of potential future investment in Queensland.

The overhaul, released yesterday in response to the Henry tax review, will have major implications for the Mackay region with the big miners predicting thousands of future job losses as a result of the tax.

The Resources Super Profits Tax (RSPT) is expected to collect $12 billion in extra revenue from mining companies, to be split between superannuation, infrastructure and businesses. While the miners will be slugged with higher taxes they also will receive $1.2 billion in resource exploration rebates.

The government will begin taxing profits made from the exploitation of non-renewable resources at 40 per cent from July, 2012.

The tax will work in conjunction with the current state royalties system but a refundable credit for royalties paid to state governments will be made available to the mining companies to avoid them paying double tax.

The Minerals Council of Australia, which represents companies including BHP Billiton and Rio Tinto, said the new tax would mean Australia’s mining industry was the highest-taxed in the world.

“We are already punching above our weight in terms of tax take,” chief executive Mitch Hooke said.

Queensland Resources Council chief executive officer Michael Roche said the government needed to implement a package that would ensure Queensland’s resources sector remained globally competitive.

“There’s a strong perception among QRC members that the Federal Government believes the resources sector has a limitless ability to pay more and more tax,” Mr Roche said.

Treasurer Wayne Swan said the RSPT would ensure Australians received a fair share of the profits made from the country’s valuable non-renewable resources.

But Opposition finance spokesperson Andrew Robb said resources companies would go to where they could maximise their returns during the boom.

“ ... if Australian projects are made uncompetitive then there’s every prospect of a lot of these projects being shelved,” Mr Robb said.



Roadcraft boss calls for national 'safe' driver program

TOO MANY DEATHS: Crash investigators at the scene of a double fatality on the Bruce Highway two kilometres north of Tiaro. Gympie Roadcraft CEO Sharlene Makin is calling for a national driver education program on how to drive safely.

Gympie Roadcraft boss calls for a national program on safe driving

If you grew up in Wolvi, you know who this is...

An Olympic Torch for the 2000 Sydney Olympics holds pride of place amongst other precious memories for this Wolvi local legend.

Check out how this Wolvi community pillar spent this milestone.

Roadcraft CEO: Driver education reform needs to happen

Sharlene Markin CEO of Road Craft Gympie.

"We set people up to fail in front of their peers

Local Partners