Members of the Save The Mary Valley Action Group, which was formed to oppose the state government's plans to dam the Mary Valley, with a sign on the Mary Valley Road, Traveston Crossing.
Members of the Save The Mary Valley Action Group, which was formed to oppose the state government's plans to dam the Mary Valley, with a sign on the Mary Valley Road, Traveston Crossing. Brett Wortman / 155578l

10 years on, final 2 Traveston Dam properties go up for sale

MORE than 10 years after the federal government blocked moves to dam the Mary Valley, the final two properties acquired for the project have been put up for sale.

The business section of The Australian is this morning reporting the two acreage sites were among 655 lots bought by the former Beattie government for $520 million, in order to build the $1.7 billion Traveston Dam.

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But in 2009, Canberra refused to grant permission for the dam on environmental grounds, leaving the state with 13,000ha of land.

Since then the sites have been sold or leased, in an effort to recoup some of the money outlaid.

In 2016, the state government revealed it had only recovered about $200m of what it paid for the lots but said the original amount included compensation for land owners.

The agency contracted to sell the properties at the start of the process, Oliver Hume, said it had achieved prices ranging from $17,000 to $8.5m for 350 lots, the Australian reports today.

Queensland manager Matt Barr said they were hopeful of getting good prices for the final two sites, at 115 Kress Road, Tuchekoi and 807 Lowe Road, Moy Pocket.

In 2007, the government paid $1.9m for the 72.8ha site in Kress Road, and $1.95m for the Lowe Road site over 62ha.

"The process is that we obtain true valuations on the properties and then offer them for sale through a tender process against those valuations," Mr Barr said.

"It's a real opportunity to purchase something at real value."

He said Kress Road had been operating as an outdoor education centre, and would suit “a school, church group or outdoor sports club. the Australian reports today.

"It used to be owned and run by Nudgee College, who ran it as their school camp," said Mr Barr.

 

John Cochrane over looking Mary Valley property about to be listed on the maket. Photo Renee Albrecht/Gympie Times
John Cochrane over looking Mary Valley property about to be listed on the maket. Photo Renee Albrecht/Gympie Times Renee Albrecht

"It has a large lake for canoeing and the like, bush tracks, something you don't see every day."

There were also a number of buildings on site, including accommodation blocks sleeping up to 80 people, a commercial kitchen fitout, conferencing rooms and administration block.

He said the Lowe Road acreage was a grazing property fronting the Mary River.

"It has a 9ha water licence associated with it, and there are two houses on site, both needing some work," Mr Barr said.

"It's just a very, very solid, grazing property and very sought-after within that area."

A spokesman for the Department of State Development confirmed the sales signalled the end of the Queensland government's sell-off of land once planned for Traveston Dam.

"These two properties were the last economic development leases to run their course and the lessees chose not to exercise their option to buy the land," he said.

"The state had previously entered into more than 20 economic development leases to foster new industry in the Mary Valley which led to the area's growth in dairy and beef cattle production."

Gympie Times


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