Lifestyle

Still gardening after 66 years

Bruce Priddy, Anne-Marie Fryar (rear) and Joyce Shanks surrounded by tropical birch trees in the Kross garden.
Bruce Priddy, Anne-Marie Fryar (rear) and Joyce Shanks surrounded by tropical birch trees in the Kross garden. Contributed

HAVING an annual general meeting is a great way for Gympie Municipal Horticultural Society to reflect on the past 12 months with garden visits, guest speakers and plant and flower competitions contributing to garden-related activities.

Everyone was thanked for taking the time to vote, and the results were announced by Gympie Regional Councillor Mick Curran with all members of society being re-elected to take their positions for another year.

Celebrating 66 years of gardening, the society is still popular with more than 100 members.

Betty Cockburn, one of the original members, was honoured when asked to accept her position of patron.

The other positions were taken up by Henry Kross as president, Robyn Bowman secretary, Raelene Kross treasurer, Sue Spork vice-president and Val Vidler tour director and provedore.

At times the weather can be a nuisance to the society, especially when holding meetings in garden settings.

But this did not dampen the members' spirit at the last meeting in Henry and Dell Kross's Wolvi garden.

Henry and Dell were very relieved to receive 2mm of rain as keeping up with the water supply to the country garden can often be difficult.

Guest speaker for the day was Leonie Shanahan, from Edible School Gardens, who is very passionate about educating children to eat healthier food rather than relying on takeaways and junk food that has very little nutritional value for their growing bodies and mind.

SHARED INTEREST: Robyn Bowman, Coral Ernst, Val Vidler, Val Deans and Mel Shaw standing beneath the potato tree in Dell and Henry Kross’s garden at Wolvi.
SHARED INTEREST: Robyn Bowman, Coral Ernst, Val Vidler, Val Deans and Mel Shaw standing beneath the potato tree in Dell and Henry Kross’s garden at Wolvi.

Do you ever wonder why the herbs, fruit and vegetables are always very appealing and perfect? Well, the consumers want the best-looking produce to be displayed on the shelves at all times.

Having beauty does not mean flavoursome.

Gardeners do not know the processes involved in growing the food that are supplied to the supermarkets, and therefore are encouraged to take control of their own health by creating their own organic edible gardens.

This is a much cheaper way of eating healthy food as organic food is very expensive to purchase.

FITTING VENUE: Gayle Robinson, guest speaker Leonie Shanahan and Dell Kross in Dell’s tropical palm garden at Gympie Horticultural Society’s AGM.
FITTING VENUE: Gayle Robinson, guest speaker Leonie Shanahan and Dell Kross in Dell’s tropical palm garden at Gympie Horticultural Society’s AGM.

Children were advised that there are good and bad insects, so extra precaution needs to be taken to make sure only the bad guys are killed by squeezing them with your fingers. Chemicals should be avoided where possible.

Reducing waste is possible by simply collecting food scraps from the tuckshop by either applying and turning the compost heap or feeding the worms. This is a much better option than going to the rubbish tip.

The castings that are produced by worms are very

beneficial because they feeds plants with nutrients, and also have the capacity to hold a large amount of water therefore less watering is required.

Disposables have a major impact on our environment, with people preferring to use plastic items for birthday and Christmas parties, and immediately disposing of them into their garbage bin.

This takes hundreds of years to break down so other alternatives have been suggested such as using arrowroot leaves as plates and buy "real" knives, forks and spoons from op shops.

WELL MET: Lynne Anson, Councillor Mick Curran and Val Quinn at the Gympie Horticultural Society AGM.
WELL MET: Lynne Anson, Councillor Mick Curran and Val Quinn at the Gympie Horticultural Society AGM.

Students get a real buzz harvesting their freshly grown organic food and making delicious meals to share with friends and families. This shows them that anything is possible by transforming a bare patch of dirt into a productive garden.

The society's Christmas luncheon will be held this

Saturday at Gunnabul Homestead from noon.

Members are encouraged to wear their Christmas outfits as there will be prizes available.

Gympie Times

Topics:  gardening, gympie municipal horticultural society




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