News

Changes to the "backpacker economy" would hurt Gympie

Will Taunton - Bernet general manager from Visit Oz. Photo Renee Albrecht/Gympie Times
Will Taunton - Bernet general manager from Visit Oz. Photo Renee Albrecht/Gympie Times Renee Albrecht

MANY Gympie region farming and tourism enterprises would suffer under planned taxation changes affecting the backpacker economy, it was claimed yesterday.

Will Taunton-Burnet, of Goomeri's VisitOz backpacker training farm, said backpacker labour kept many small farms afloat, especially orchards and other seasonal operations in the Gympie region.

The Cooloola Coast tourism economy would miss them too, if planned tax changes make them reconsider their visit to Australia.

That was the real risk from Turnbull Government plans to introduce a 32.5% no-threshold tax on working holidaymakers, he said.

At present, many Australian backpackers get full tax refunds because they earn less than the $18,200 a year income tax threshold.

Foreign backpackers pay only 13% tax up to the threshold.

Mr Taunton-Burnet said this meant their tax instalments are often refunded after they return home.

A simple improvement that would make everyone better off, including the government, would be to not tax them in the first place for refundable amounts, allowing them to spend the money while they are still here.

That would benefit tourism businesses and generate extra tax payments on extra income from tourist operators.

"We've got about 2000 farms on our books and we refer backpacker clients to them," Mr Taunton-Burnet said.

"We meet and greet at Brisbane airport, take them to the beach for a few days, then train them in rural employment skills at Goomeri, before helping them find a job," he said.

"They put their effort into the farming economy and then spend their money visiting places like Rainbow Beach and Fraser Island.

"Then they would probably front up for another temporary farm job to finance their next break."

"The main thing is the proposed changes will end up putting less money in the backpacker's pocket," he said.

"The knock-on effect of that is they will not spend it in the local Australian economy."

He called for "some mechanism that would encourage them to spend their money in Australia, doing all the wonderful things that can be done here, rather than taking that money overseas and having it as a sort of post-visit refund.

"The vast majority of backpackers come here for a working holiday.

"They work, learn skills and grow up as well as having a holiday.

"It's important to the economy from two perspectives.

"They provide labour for

the farming sector and customers for tourism.

"It's a double win in that they put their economic effort into rural industries and then spend the proceeds on tourist industries."

Gympie Regional Council tourism councillor Julie Walker said overseas backpackers brought more than mere economic benefits.

"It brings diversity and culture into an area, all those different types of people from different parts of the Earth. It's great to have them here."

Rainbow Beach business operator Ruth Modin has also often praised the contribution of backpackers outside of their economic contribution.

"They keep us young," she said during a recent holiday season.

Cr Walker said many farming operations depended on seasonal workers.

 

Gympie Times

Topics:  economy, tourism




UPDATE: Man charged with endangering children in Gympie

The man and two children were travelling in this vehicle.

The two children were missing from Emerald

Men in custody after police swarm house, find missing baby

Police believe the baby girl may be with a 16-year-old and 19-year-old in a green 1995 Mazda 121 with Queensland registration 045GOS, and could be heading to Toowoomba.

The two men and baby girl could be heading to Toowoomba

Debate rages over $65 levy to help resurrect Rattler

Gympie Regional Council's decision to impose an Economic Development Levy to help get the Rattler back on track has come under fire from letter writers to The Gympie Times.

Debate rages in our letters to the editor over the Rattler levy

Latest deals and offers

Tom Hiddleston's Instagram account hacked

Actor Tom Hiddleston

Thor star the latest celebrity targetted by hackers

Charlize Theron's son dresses up as Frozen character

Actor Charlize Theron

Star's son spotted dressed a beloved Frozen character

BOOKS: Food for thought in Caroline Beecham's latest novel

Maggie's Kitchen by Caroline Beecham is published by Allen & Unwin, RRP $29.99.

New novel reminds readers that bravery exists in many forms

TELEVISION: New show is a Survivor, for now

Jonathan LaPaglia hosts the TV series Australian Survivor.

WHAT happens when a new show with a big budget flops?

Rachel Weisz understands celebrity gossip fascination

Actor Rachel Weisz

Weisz says mystery is good for an actor

Gina Rodriguez relished dramatic change for new film

Jane the Virgin lead Gina Rodriguez

TV star shaved her hair for movie role

REVEALED: Pat Rafter's $18m Coast house on the market

Check out the photos of the Coast's most expensive property for sale

The "correction we had to have" in Gladstone's rentals

UPWARD MARCH: The rental vacancy rate in Gladstone has improved for the first time in more than a year, providing a confidence boost in the market.

Vacancy rates improve with signs that things are getting betterF

ISLAND FOR SALE: Cheap Fraser Coast island drops price again

Suna Island in the Great Sandy Strait will be auctioned by Ray White Hervey Bay on Saturday morning.

This is the cheapest island you will find for sale in Australia

How a family home can fit on a 250sq m block

This is what you can build on 250m2.

Here's the floor plan of a home built on 250sq m

$100m plan for Curtis Island 'world class' luxury resort

$100 million resort: Top views at Turtle Street at Curtis Island.

"At the moment we think it meets all the town planning approvals.”

Noosa mayor on "red alert" over planning court decision

Mayor Tony Wellington hands down his first budget.

Mayor upset at lack of say about look and feel of Noosa